Student Invitational

Chaffey College and the Wignall Museum of Contemporary Art proudly present Student Invitational, the annual juried exhibition featuring Chaffey College student artists. In this rigorous program, the selected artists work closely with faculty, the museum curators and staff, and other art professionals to create a new body of work.

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Student Invitational 2023

Wignall Museum of Contemporary Art
Chaffey College
April 17 – May 11, 2023

SI23 Artists

Mandy Asuncion
Honey Bryan
Mackenzie Bussola
Cam Santa Anna
Alex Cuauhtli
Kimberly Grahn
Maximiliano Lopez
Diana S. Martinez
Q
Alexa Rand
Angel Soltero
Delfina Torres


SI23 Exhibition Guide

View the Exhibition Guide


Gallery

  • “Student Invitational 2023” (April 17 – May 11, 2023). Wignall Museum of Contemporary Art, Chaffey College, Rancho Cucamonga, CA.
  • Honey Bryan Artist Statement for “Student Invitational 2023.”
  • Honey Bryan, “The Trophy Room,” 2023. Air-dry clay, plaster wrap, and duct tape, mixed-media, and found objects.
  • Honey Bryan, “The Trophy Room,” 2023. Air-dry clay, plaster wrap, and duct tape, mixed-media, and found objects.
  • Honey Bryan, “The Trophy Room,” 2023. Air-dry clay, plaster wrap, and duct tape, mixed-media, and found objects.
  • Honey Bryan, “The Trophy Room,” 2023. Air-dry clay, plaster wrap, and duct tape, mixed-media, and found objects.
  • Honey Bryan, “The Trophy Room,” 2023. Air-dry clay, plaster wrap, and duct tape, mixed-media, and found objects.
  • Honey Bryan, “The Trophy Room,” 2023. Air-dry clay, plaster wrap, and duct tape, mixed-media, and found objects.
  • Honey Bryan, “The Trophy Room,” 2023. Air-dry clay, plaster wrap, and duct tape, mixed-media, and found objects.
  • Honey Bryan, “The Trophy Room,” 2023. Air-dry clay, plaster wrap, and duct tape, mixed-media, and found objects.
  • Angel Soltero Artist Statement for “Student Invitational 2023.”
  • Angel Soltero, 2023. Oil on canvas. 18 x 24 inches each.
  • Angel Soltero, 2023. Oil on canvas. 18 x 24 inches each.
  • Angel Soltero, “Comunidad,” 2023. Oil on canvas. 18 x 24 inches.
  • Angel Soltero, ‘Caballero,” 2023. Oil on canvas. 18 x 24 inches.
  • Angel Soltero, “Terreno,” 2023. Oil on canvas. 18 x 24 inches.
  • Diana S. Martinez Artist Statement for “Student Invitational 2023.”
  • Diana S. Martinez, “Connected Spaces,” 2023. Decorated desk, journal, rock, branch, inkjet prints, CRT monitors, analog video. 60 x 40 inches (prints). TRT: 4 minutes.
  • Diana S. Martinez, “Connected Spaces,” 2023. Decorated desk, journal, rock, branch, inkjet prints, CRT monitors, analog video. 60 x 40 inches (prints). TRT: 4 minutes.
  • Diana S. Martinez, “Connected Spaces,” 2023. Decorated desk, journal, rock, branch, inkjet prints, CRT monitors, analog video. 60 x 40 inches (prints). TRT: 4 minutes.
  • Diana S. Martinez, “Connected Spaces,” 2023. Decorated desk, journal, rock, branch, inkjet prints, CRT monitors, analog video. 60 x 40 inches (prints). TRT: 4 minutes.
  • Diana S. Martinez, “Connected Spaces,” 2023. Decorated desk, journal, rock, branch, inkjet prints, CRT monitors, analog video. 60 x 40 inches (prints). TRT: 4 minutes.
  • Alexa Rand Artist Statement for “Student Invitational 2023.”
  • Alexa Rand, “Along the River,” 2023. Crocheted yarn, fired & glazed clay, black river stones, and fiber fill. Approximately 8 x 4 feet.
  • Alexa Rand, “Along the River,” 2023. Crocheted yarn, fired & glazed clay, black river stones, and fiber fill. Approximately 8 x 4 feet.
  • Alexa Rand, “Along the River,” 2023. Crocheted yarn, fired & glazed clay, black river stones, and fiber fill. Approximately 8 x 4 feet.
  • Alexa Rand, “Along the River,” 2023. Crocheted yarn, fired & glazed clay, black river stones, and fiber fill. Approximately 8 x 4 feet.
  • Alexa Rand, “Along the River,” 2023. Crocheted yarn, fired & glazed clay, black river stones, and fiber fill. Approximately 8 x 4 feet.
  • Alexa Rand, “Along the River,” 2023. Crocheted yarn, fired & glazed clay, black river stones, and fiber fill. Approximately 8 x 4 feet.
  • Mandy Asuncion Artist Statement for “Student Invitational 2023.”
  • Mandy Asuncion, “Untitled,” 2023. Canvas, plaster, and acrylic. 5 x 8 feet.
  • Mandy Asuncion, “Untitled,” 2023. Canvas, plaster, and acrylic. 5 x 8 feet.
  • Mandy Asuncion, “Untitled,” 2023. Canvas, plaster, and acrylic. 5 x 8 feet.
  • Mandy Asuncion, “Untitled,” 2023. Canvas, plaster, and acrylic. 5 x 8 feet.
  • Mandy Asuncion, “Untitled,” 2023. Canvas, plaster, and acrylic. 5 x 8 feet.
  • Alex Cuauhtli Artist Statement for “Student Invitational 2023.”
  • Alex Cuauhtli, “Luxuries,” 2023. Digital animation (1080p HD Digital Video). TRT: 47 seconds.
  • Alex Cuauhtli, “Luxuries,” 2023. Digital animation (1080p HD Digital Video). TRT: 47 seconds.
  • Alex Cuauhtli, “Luxuries,” 2023. Digital animation (1080p HD Digital Video). TRT: 47 seconds.
  • Maximiliano Lopez Artist Statement for “Student Invitational 2023.”
  • Maximiliano Lopez, “Marrow,” 2023. Steel wire, zip ties, duct tape, and nylon stockings. Approximately 8.5 feet each.
  • Maximiliano Lopez, “Marrow,” 2023. Steel wire, zip ties, duct tape, and nylon stockings. Approximately 8.5 feet each.
  • Maximiliano Lopez, “Marrow,” 2023. Steel wire, zip ties, duct tape, and nylon stockings. Approximately 8.5 feet each.
  • Maximiliano Lopez, “Marrow,” 2023. Steel wire, zip ties, duct tape, and nylon stockings. Approximately 8.5 feet each.
  • Maximiliano Lopez, “Marrow,” 2023. Steel wire, zip ties, duct tape, and nylon stockings. Approximately 8.5 feet each.
  • Maximiliano Lopez, “Marrow,” 2023. Steel wire, zip ties, duct tape, and nylon stockings. Approximately 8.5 feet each.
  • Maximiliano Lopez, “Marrow,” 2023. Steel wire, zip ties, duct tape, and nylon stockings. Approximately 8.5 feet each.
  • Maximiliano Lopez, “Marrow,” 2023. Steel wire, zip ties, duct tape, and nylon stockings. Approximately 8.5 feet each.
  • Maximiliano Lopez, “Marrow,” 2023. Steel wire, zip ties, duct tape, and nylon stockings. Approximately 8.5 feet each.
  • Makenzie Bussola Artist Statement for “Student Invitational 2023.”
  • Mackenzie Bussola, “’Art’,” 2023. Crochet. Custom sized to fit the artist.
  • Mackenzie Bussola, “Sweater Scarf & ‘Art’ Hat,” 2023. Acrylic yarn scraps. 3 x 60 inches, 4 x 13.5 x 31 inches.
  • Mackenzie Bussola, “Wavy Sweater & Hat,” 2023. Acrylic thrifted yarn and an unraveled sweater. 19 x 57 inches, 4 x 13.5 x 31.
  • Mackenzie Bussola, “’Fine Art’ Vest & Birthday Cake Hat,” 2023. Cotton and acrylic yarn scraps and an unraveled thrifted sweater. 16 x 18.5 inches, 4 x 14 x 32 inches.
  • Delfina Torres Artist Statement for “Student Invitational 2023.”
  • Delfina Torres Artist Statement for “Student Invitational 2023.”
  • Delfina Torres, “Vessels Within Vessels,” 2023. Fired & glazed clay. Jars approximately 20 inches tall.
  • Delfina Torres, “Vessels Within Vessels,” 2023. Fired & glazed clay. Jars approximately 20 inches tall.
  • Delfina Torres, “Vessels Within Vessels,” 2023. Fired & glazed clay. Jars approximately 20 inches tall.
  • Delfina Torres, “Vessels Within Vessels,” 2023. Fired & glazed clay. Jars approximately 20 inches tall.
  • Delfina Torres, “Vessels Within Vessels,” 2023. Fired & glazed clay. Jars approximately 20 inches tall.
  • Delfina Torres, “Vessels Within Vessels,” 2023. Fired & glazed clay. Jars approximately 20 inches tall.
  • Delfina Torres, “Vessels Within Vessels,” 2023. Fired & glazed clay. Jars approximately 20 inches tall.
  • Delfina Torres, “Vessels Within Vessels,” 2023. Fired & glazed clay. Jars approximately 20 inches tall.
  • Delfina Torres, “Vessels Within Vessels,” 2023. Fired & glazed clay. Jars approximately 20 inches tall.
  • Delfina Torres, “Vessels Within Vessels,” 2023. Fired & glazed clay. Jars approximately 20 inches tall.
  • Delfina Torres, “Vessels Within Vessels,” 2023. Fired & glazed clay. Jars approximately 20 inches tall.
  • Delfina Torres, “Vessels Within Vessels,” 2023. Fired & glazed clay. Jars approximately 20 inches tall.
  • Delfina Torres, “Vessels Within Vessels,” 2023. Fired & glazed clay. Jars approximately 20 inches tall.
  • Delfina Torres, “Vessels Within Vessels,” 2023. Fired & glazed clay. Jars approximately 20 inches tall.
  • Kimberly Grahn Artist Statement for “Student Invitational 2023.”
  • Kimberly Grahn, 2023. Ink and watercolor on burnt paper; cardboard and wood with glass; aluminum wire and foil. 24 x 24 inches each.
  • Kimberly Grahn, 2023. Ink and watercolor on burnt paper; cardboard and wood with glass; aluminum wire and foil. 24 x 24 inches each.
  • Kimberly Grahn, “RC,” 2023. Ink and watercolor on burnt paper; cardboard and wood with glass; aluminum wire and foil. 24 x 24 inches.
  • Kimberly Grahn, “Purple Baby,” 2023. Ink and watercolor on burnt paper; cardboard and wood with glass; aluminum wire and foil. 24 x 24 inches.
  • Kimberly Grahn, “Tailspin,” 2023. Ink and watercolor on burnt paper; cardboard and wood with glass; aluminum wire and foil. 24 x 24 inches.
  • Q Artist Statement for “Student Invitational 2023.”
  • Q Artist Statement for “Student Invitational 2023.”
  • Q Artist Statement for “Student Invitational 2023.”
  • Q, “A Cup of Water,” 2023. Acrylic, glasses, and plywood
  • Q, “A Cup of Water,” 2023. Acrylic, glasses, and plywood
  • Q, “A Cup of Water,” 2023. Acrylic, glasses, and plywood
  • Q, “A Cup of Water,” 2023. Acrylic, glasses, and plywood
  • Q, “A Cup of Water,” 2023. Acrylic, glasses, and plywood
  • Q, “A Cup of Water,” 2023. Acrylic, glasses, and plywood
  • Q, “A Cup of Water,” 2023. Cards.
  • Cam Santa Anna Artist Statement for “Student Invitational 2023.”
  • Cam Santa Anna, “Intra-action,” 2023. Beaded curtains & wood, LCD Projectors, video, and sound.
  • Cam Santa Anna, “Intra-action,” 2023. Beaded curtains & wood, LCD Projectors, video, and sound.
  • Cam Santa Anna, “Intra-action,” 2023. Beaded curtains & wood, LCD Projectors, video, and sound.
  • Cam Santa Anna, “Intra-action,” 2023. Beaded curtains & wood, LCD Projectors, video, and sound.
  • Cam Santa Anna, “Intra-action,” 2023. Beaded curtains & wood, LCD Projectors, video, and sound.
  • Cam Santa Anna, “Intra-action,” 2023. Beaded curtains & wood, LCD Projectors, video, and sound.
  • Cam Santa Anna, “Intra-action,” 2023. Beaded curtains & wood, LCD Projectors, video, and sound.
  • Cam Santa Anna, “Intra-action,” 2023. Beaded curtains & wood, LCD Projectors, video, and sound.
  • Cam Santa Anna, “Intra-action,” 2023. Beaded curtains & wood, LCD Projectors, video, and sound.
  • Cam Santa Anna, “Intra-action,” 2023. Beaded curtains & wood, LCD Projectors, video, and sound.
  • Cam Santa Anna, “Intra-action,” 2023. Beaded curtains & wood, LCD Projectors, video, and sound.
  • Cam Santa Anna, “Intra-action,” 2023. Beaded curtains & wood, LCD Projectors, video, and sound.

Statements

Mandy Asuncion

Untitled marks my first venture into sculpture. Rather than using a flat canvas as a surface on which to apply paint, here I explore the textile nature of canvas through drapery and curvature. The work is then hung on a wall to retain the feel of a conventional painting, merging my familiar painting practice with a new sculptural language. Untitled emerges from my experiences growing up as a dancer and utilizes abstraction to suggest the vulnerability of the human body.

Honey Bryan

The Trophy Room recreates a bland and boring living-dining space of a small apartment occupied by a family of three deer-headed people. With this work, I wanted to reach deep into my memories to remember what ran through my head when I was small.

Mackenzie Bussola

Many people believe crochet is simply a craft but I see it as equal to any fine art form out there. This collection was created from reused yarn from thrifted sweaters or old projects I've unraveled, allowing these old and forgotten materials to be seen again as wearable “Art.”

Cam Santa Anna

A door opens on to a darkened room of projections, wooden beams, and beaded curtains. You are welcome to sit and watch the videos, to explore the space by passing through the curtains, and through the two projections of videos simultaneously playing. Videos relating my queer identity, concepts of physics, and the natural world are stacked on each other and diffracted through multiple beaded curtains and walls. This installation is inspired by the famous double-slit experiment of quantum mechanics as well as physicist and feminist theorist Karen Barad's writings, lectures, and interdisciplinary approach. Through focusing on the relationship between the queer experience and the quantum world, this installation both investigates how the contradicting and uncertain nature of quantum laws can apply to the queer experience and highlights how the governing laws of the universe are fundamentally queer.

Alex Cuauhtli

Luxuries is an animation based on a video clip that went viral two and a half years ago, an excerpt of an interview between talk show personality Larry King and comedian Danny Pudi on the subject of luxuries they can't live without. Playing off the inadvertently comedic tone of this particular interview, I added visual gags to the scenes that act as accents to their talking points including a floating pair of socks or a toy plane rolling across the table. 

Kimberly Grahn

RC
A nostalgic and historical view of my time spent in Rancho Cucamonga.

Purple Baby
Resilience in times of adversity and betrayal.

Tailspin
Coming out of disorientation and chaos with the courage to recover and move forward.

Maximiliano Lopez

Suspended in air and sitting directly on the floor, the three abstract biomorphic sculptures coexist in this installation. Separate but connected, the forms ask the viewers to feel the space they inhabit together.

Diana S. Martinez

With Connected Spaces, I aimed to create a dreamy & nightmarish mood and to bring the experience of the forest into this space. For me, nature and the online world intertwine, and I wanted to share that experience here.

Q

Hi Q! Could you describe what A Cup of Water means?
Sure! A Cup of Water is a concept that I've created to explore the interplay between perception, transformation, and belonging. It consists of three chapters: Exchange, Direction, and Belonging.

Is there no actual cup of water in the gallery?
Correct. Instead of having a physical cup of water, I've created a space for people to experience the artwork more abstractly and intuitively.

What do you mean by Exchange
In the Exchange space, viewers are required to exchange an item for a pair of customized eyeglasses that they will use throughout the gallery. The eyeglasses are not symbolic of water; they simply serve as a medium to change the viewer's perspective.

How do I exchange an item? Is anything okay?
Yes, anything is okay. Take a black tag and write your name, date and dollar amount that represents your item’s value to you. Then attach the tag to your item and place the item with the tag in the gray triangular box.

Do I need to put the eyeglasses back?
Yes, please leave the glasses behind when you finish your journey in the Exchange space so that other viewers can also experience the artwork.

Oh, okay! How about Direction?
Now you have to decide whether to enter the Belonging space (outdoor courtyard) or stay in the gallery. My intention is that you stay in the space for a full hour.  No one will disturb you at that time. To go there, you need to sign a blank card.

Sorry, I’m confused. What’s the difference between Direction and Belonging?
To clarify, Direction involves filling out a blank card before entering and after leaving the outdoor space that is part of “Belonging.”

What about the Belonging space?
It’s hard to use words to describe the space, you have to feel it. That’s why I leave some space for you to imagine it. It’s all about you, not me.

Why do you call this artwork A Cup of Water?
The grayscale colors, the card, and the space are carefully crafted to create an experience that invites the viewer to engage with their inner world. It's kind of like a space experience. Different seasons still exist here, never changing, waiting for you to come back, even going through high and low, it's still open for you. It's a cup of water that's the origin of life.

Alexa Rand

Before you is my river of handmade fired & glazed clay rock sculptures, hand-crocheted strands of yarn, as well as purchased small black stones and fiberfill. Each of the forty rock sculptures are unique in their designs, and each of the one-hundred crocheted strands are made up of about six-hundred twenty-five stitches.

Angel Soltero

In this body of work, I display what I see everyday in my community: the loss of homes and neighborhoods due to the construction of warehouses. I've been wanting to create these paintings for the past four years as the construction has taken down a new neighborhood every month. There's not much time left before the whole town is commercialized for profit. Like me, the people living here are predominantly lower-class Mexican immigrants whose families have been here for decades, but now fear losing their homes. 

Delfina Torres

Vessels Within Vessels is a series of clay works that tell my life story through three significant health scares: the burning of my face as a three-year-old child, the discovery of an abnormal heart mutation in my heart when I was 26, and a mini-stroke last year at the age of 33. Composed of a set of three jars with sculptured lids and two human organs made of clay, Vessels within vessels is a tribute to my Aztec heritage as well as a nod to my fascination with the Ancient Egyptian practice of preserving body organs of the deceased in canopic jars.

Age 3: Face Burn
Anubis Jar Lid depicts the Egyptian god who travels to the afterlife and places the heart of the deceased on the scale. A head of a jackal with one section stripped down to the skull. Refers to the past injury to my face.

Age 26: Heart Mutation
Quetzalcoatl Jar Lid portrays the Aztec god who traveled to the underworld to collect bones of previous humans. A serpent with feathers.
Heart: A vessel for blood. The Ancient Egyptians believed that the heart recorded all the good and bad deeds of a person's life and used it for judgment in the afterlife. Refers to the discovery of a muscle mutation in one of my main arteries, making it larger than normal.

Age 33: Mini-Stroke
Mictlantecuhtli Jar Lid depicts the Aztec god of the underworld. Skull with feathered headpiece.
Brain: A vessel for ideas and memories. Refers to my recent mini-stroke


Student Invitational 2022

VIEW THE EXHIBITION GUIDE


Gallery

  • Installation view of “Student Invitational 2022.” From left: Jusin Braden, Ruby Van Den Broek, Justin Keryakes, Melanie Delaney.
  • Installation view of “Student Invitational 2022.” From left: Yves Jackson, Annabelle Erickson, Justin Braden, Ruby Van Den Broek, Joseph Keryakes.
  • Installation view of “Student Invitational 2022.” From left: Morgan Turner, Yves Jackson, Annabelle Erickson, Ruby Van Den Broek.
  • Installation view of “Student Invitational 2022.” From left: Annabelle Erickson, Justin Braden.
  • Installation view of “Student Invitational 2022.” From left: Ruby Van Den Broek, Annabelle Erickson.
  • Installation view of “Student Invitational 2022.” From left: Ruby Van Den Broek, Morgan Turner, Yves Jackson, Faith Antillon.
  • Artist’s Statement for “Student Invitational 2022
  • Installation view: Faith Antillon, “In the Comfort of Creatures,” 2022.
  • Faith Antillon, “In the Comfort of Creatures: Vintage,” 2022. Colored pencil, watercolor, acrylic paint, soft pastels, and gel pen on mixed media. 24 x 18 inches.
  • Faith Antillon, “In the Comfort of Creatures: Retro,” 2022. Colored pencil, watercolor, acrylic paint, soft pastels, and gel pen on mixed media. 24 x 18 inches.
  • Faith Antillon, “In the Comfort of Creatures: Modern,” 2022. Colored pencil, watercolor, acrylic paint, soft pastels, and gel pen on mixed media. 24 x 18 inches.
  • Artist’s Statement for “Student Invitational 2022.”
  • Installation view: Justin Braden, “Cityscape” and “Underground,” 2022.
  • Justin Braden, “Cityscape,” 2022. Acrylic, tissue paper, and glue on canvas. 16 x 20 inches.
  • Justin Braden, “Underground,” 2022. Acrylic, tissue paper, and glue on canvas. 16 x 20 inches.
  • Melanie Delaney, Artist’s Statement for “Student Invitational 2022.”
  • Installation view: Melanie Delaney, “Student Invitational 2022.”
  • Melanie Delaney, “Holzbläser-Duett im Herbst [Woodwind Duet in Autumn]”, 2022. Oil pastels and colored pencil on paper. 24 x 18 inches.
  • Melanie Delaney, “Streichtrio im Winter [String Trio in Winter]”, 2022. Oil pastels and colored pencil on paper. 24 x 18 inches.
  • Melanie Delaney, “Blechbläser-Duo im Frühling [Brass Duo in Spring]”, 2022. Oil pastels and colored pencil on paper. 24 x 18 inches.
  • Annabelle Erickson, Artist’s Statement for “Student Invitational 2022.”
  • Installation view: Annabelle Erickson, “Abnormality,” 2022.
  • Annabelle Erickson, “Radio,” 2022. Digital illustration prints. 24 x 18 inches.
  • Annabelle Erickson, “Kijivu,” 2022. Digital illustration prints. 24 x 18 inches.
  • Annabelle Erickson, “Plague,” 2022. Digital illustration prints. 24 x 18 inches.
  • Annabelle Erickson, “Death,” 2022. Digital illustration prints. 24 x 18 inches.
  • Annabelle Erickson, “War,” 2022. Digital illustration prints. 24 x 18 inches.
  • Annabelle Erickson, “Famine,” 2022. Digital illustration prints. 24 x 18 inches.
  • Annabelle Erickson, “Endelle,” 2022. Digital illustration prints. 24 x 18 inches.
  • Annabelle Erickson, “Lyra,” 2022. Digital illustration prints. 24 x 18 inches.
  • Annabelle Erickson, “Diaboli Ex Animus,: 2022. Digital illustration prints. 24 x 18 inches.
  • Yves Jackson, Artist’s Statement for “Student Invitational 2022.”
  • Installation view: Yves Jackson, “Peace of Mind,” 2022.
  • Yves Jackson, “Peace of Mind,” 2022. Skateboard decks, paint, moss, sand, twigs, leaves, fiber artificial flowers, bottle caps, wood, metal, cardboard, beads, cobblestones, cork, rubber, and plastic. 9 x 29 x 16 inches.
  • Yves Jackson, “Peace of Mind,” 2022. Skateboard decks, paint, moss, sand, twigs, leaves, fiber artificial flowers, bottle caps, wood, metal, cardboard, beads, cobblestones, cork, rubber, and plastic. 9 x 29 x 16 inches.
  • Yves Jackson, “Peace of Mind,” 2022. Skateboard decks, paint, moss, sand, twigs, leaves, fiber artificial flowers, bottle caps, wood, metal, cardboard, beads, cobblestones, cork, rubber, and plastic. 9 x 29 x 16 inches.
  • Joseph Keryakes, Artist’s Statement for “Student Invitational 2022.”
  • Installation view: Joseph Keryakes, “Inner Landscapes,” 2022.
  • Joseph Keryakes, “Inner Landscapes,” 2022. Fifty ceramic tiles. 12 x 12 inches each.
  • Joseph Keryakes, “Inner Landscapes,” 2022. Fifty ceramic tiles. 12 x 12 inches each.
  • Joseph Keryakes, “Inner Landscapes,” 2022. Fifty ceramic tiles. 12 x 12 inches each.
  • Evelin Gonzalez Padilla, Artist’s Statement for “Student Invitational 2022.”
  • Evelin Gonzalez Padilla, “World at War,” 2022. Installation of paper, duct tape, foam board, light and sound.
  • Evelin Gonzalez Padilla, “World at War,” 2022. Installation of paper, duct tape, foam board, light and sound.
  • Evelin Gonzalez Padilla, “World at War,” 2022. Installation of paper, duct tape, foam board, light and sound.
  • Lo Run, Artist’s Statement for “Student Invitational 2022.”
  • Installation view: Lo Run, “Home,” 2022.
  • Lo Run, “Home,” 2022. Fired and unfired clay, wood, plastic, fabric, paper, and acrylic paint. 12 x 12 x 12 inches each.
  • Lo Run, “Home,” 2022. Fired and unfired clay, wood, plastic, fabric, paper, and acrylic paint. 12 x 12 x 12 inches each.
  • Morgan Turner, Artist’s Statement for “Student Invitational 2022.”
  • Installation view: Morgan Turner, “Headspace,” 2022. Ink on paper. Dimensions variable.
  • Morgan Turner, “Headspace,” 2022. Ink on paper. Dimensions variable.
  • Morgan Turner, “Headspace,” 2022. Ink on paper. Dimensions variable.
  • Morgan Turner, “Headspace,” 2022. Ink on paper. Dimensions variable.
  • Morgan Turner, “Headspace,” 2022. Ink on paper. Dimensions variable.
  • Morgan Turner, “Headspace,” 2022. Ink on paper. Dimensions variable.
  • Ruby Van Den Broek, Artist’s Statement for “Student Invitational 2022.”
  • Installation view: Ruby Van Den Broek, “Student Invitational 2022.”
  • Installation view: Ruby Van Den Broek, “Student Invitational 2022.”
  • Installation view: Ruby Van Den Broek, “Student Invitational 2022.”
  • Ruby Van Den Broek, “Grounded: Much Needed Rest,” 2022. Bisque fired ceramic, broken tree branch, badger skull, rodent jaw, and acrylic paint. 47 inches wide.
  • Ruby Van Den Broek, “Grounded: Poplar Tree,” 2022. Unfired ceramic clay and embedded tree branch. 19 inches tall.
  • Ruby Van Den Broek, “Grounded: Enveloped,” 2022. Bisque fired ceramic. 17 inches tall.

Statements

Faith Antillon

"In the Comfort of Creatures" is a love letter to the horror genre, the very thing that I have ironically found comfort in. Each work draws inspiration from iconic horror movie posters from the early creature flicks of the 1940s-50s (Vintage), to the eccentric 1980s (Retro), and the modern horror of today (Modern). Although the characters featured in real posters look uncomfortable and terrified, I reimagine them as if they find pleasure in their contact with the creatures.
@_serenathefriendlyspirit

Justin Braden

The two paintings in the exhibition were inspired by a trip to New York City a few years ago. The first canvas, "Cityscape," seeks to capture the feeling I had walking around the city. My second painting, "Underground," depicts an imaginary ancient city set in a cave filled with stalactites and stalagmites, and a stream flowing through it. For this project, I challenged myself to explore different types of perspective drawing, using both one-point and two-point perspectives. In addition, I experimented with two materials that I have never used before: acrylic paint and tissue paper.

Melanie Delaney

"Holzbläser-Duett im Herbst [Woodwind Duet in Autumn]" depicts a brown bear playing the accordion alongside a raccoon with a clarinet near a creek. "Streichtrio im Winter [String Trio in Winter]" presents a red deer with an upright bass, a mountain hare with a mandolin, and a red fox with a fiddle in the mountain peaks. "Blechbläser-Duo im Frühling [Brass Duo in Spring]" shows two marmots with alpenhorns on a rocky mountainside.
@smellvino

Annabelle Erickson

I create characters because the process helps me to feel a sense of control over or connection with the world around me. The work shown in this exhibition showcases characters from my original story, "Abnormality," which has been in development since my childhood. Modeled after tarot cards, each print offers a concise snapshot of a single character and serves as a window into their complex storyline. These characters are my life’s work, so seeing them fully developed and on display for the public is a dream come true. I hope audiences can see themselves in the characters – whether in terms of personality, attitude, style, or even story – just as I did when creating them.
@vicious_milk_art

Yves Jackson

My work "Peace of Mind" is a scale model of a peaceful, joyful scene based on a combination of city and national parks. Repurposing found objects into sculptures is both soothing to me and friendly to the environment.
@skeighterjack

Joseph Keryakes

"Inner Landscapes" is a collection of fifty one-foot square tiles made over the course of about fifty days. During this period, I have made it a daily practice to fabricate, design, or glaze a ceramic tile with the goal of creating one tile for each day. It is a form of disciplined physical and mental exercise, much like the training I did the year before that led me to lose seventy pounds in two months. It represents my struggles to stay consistent with healthy habits and my own dedication to being a creator.

Evelin Gonzalez Padilla

Wars are something that I often reflect on in my everyday existence. Now that we are in the middle of another war, it felt natural to focus my project on this topic. "World at War" is one of the ways I am attempting to make sense of the chaotic world. It is both a realistic representation of our tragic history and also an idealistic plea for positive change.
https://egonzalezp.myportfolio.com

Lo Run

"Home" is a culmination of my fascination with miniatures and my love of clay. These two environments are small-scale representations of my studio and my bedroom. By presenting these miniature spaces to you, you gain access to my most private environments. Perhaps you will allow these environments to comfort you the way that they have comforted me all these years.
@lorunceramics
https://www.lorunceramics.com

Morgan Turner

"Headspace" is a collection of drawings made using black ink and a sumi brush. Ink is a new medium for me, so my approach to this body of work is extremely experimental, making the process just as important as the finished work. Through trial and error, I discovered that ink has a strong way of communicating emotionally through the versatility of its marks, which are endlessly variable depending on the dryness of the brush, the pace at which you move your hand, and the amount of pressure you apply to the surface. I had to learn how to manipulate the brush and ink to capture a feeling on paper.
@uhh_morg

Ruby Van Den Broek

"Grounded" addresses the relationship between humans and nature. The figures in the work fully embrace the earth, seeking to become one with it literally and figuratively. Each figure represents humans and our connection to the earth and the desire to become more connected with nature. Each figure is going through a transitional process in their next step in life. Whether that is death or birth, they graciously embrace that change.
@rouxbee.ink


Virtual Reception & Walk-Through




Student Invitational 2021

VIEW THE EXHIBITION GUIDE


Gallery



  • Artist’s statement by babyparts. What would you like to happen with your social media profile when you die?
www.digital-remains.com
  • babyparts, graphic from “Digital Remains,” 2021. Website: www.digital-remains.com
  • 027_Facebook deleted my mom’s page immediately. I wish I could still visit it.
  • 021_I got control of my mother fb when she died. I would like my gf to have control over mine.
  • 005_Delete all my messages.
  • 030_I would like my account memorialized and my husband take control of my account.
  • Artist’s statement by Vincent Blair. As a young Black man that experiences the division between different ethnicities and cultures in America in real life and in the media, I feel driven to create work that expresses my desire for people to show more unity and love.
  • Vincent Blair, “Unity Project,” 2021. Oil and acrylic on canvas, wood, 24 x 25 inches.
  • Vincent Blair, detail of “Unity Project” (MAGA man), 2021. Oil and acrylic on canvas, wood, 24 x 25 inches.
  • Vincent Blair, detail of “Unity Project” (BLM man), 2021. Oil and acrylic on canvas, wood, 24 x 25 inches.
  • Vincent Blair, detail of “Unity Project” (hand), 2021. Oil and acrylic on canvas, wood, 24 x 25 inches.
  • Artist’s statement by Dez DLT. “The Visitor” is a short claymation inspired by the cabin fever of the early days of quarantine. Although I’ve always known I was an introvert, COVID-19 restrictions have made me realize that I enjoyed socializing much more than I had thought. Like the character in The Visitor, I find myself ingesting brain numbing content in the privacy of my studio and avoiding the dangers of the outside world. This work aims to mimic the monotony of the past year; it emphasizes the slow and unnerving passage of time, questions the safety of the present, and expresses uncertainty of the future. Aside from recording a personal experience, The Visitor is my addition to the ever-growing black hole of brain-numbing content that we can all distract ourselves with when reality is a little bit too scary.
  • Dez DLT, still from “The Visitor” (man on sofa), 2021. HD Video (stop-motion animation), TRT: 01:45.
  • Dez DLT, still from “The Visitor” (man turning TV off), 2021. HD Video (stop-motion animation), TRT: 01:45.
  • Dez DLT, still from “The Visitor” (man looking back), 2021. HD Video (stop-motion animation), TRT: 01:45.
  • Dez DLT, still from “The Visitor” (the visitor on sofa), 2021. HD Video (stop-motion animation), TRT: 01:45.
  • Dez DLT, still from “The Visitor” (man’s face), 2021. HD Video (stop-motion animation), TRT: 01:45.
  • Artist’s statement by Nicholas Del Rosario. My piece is a tribute to the victims of this virus that had their livelihoods shortened as a result of negligent actions from the American government and the general populous. Every person who chooses not to wear a mask, not to quarantine, and not to follow government mandated regulations and guidelines were responsible for a digit at the end of this receipt. All life is temporary. People will continue to die, regardless of whether there is a pandemic, but to gamble with a life that is not one’s own is reprehensible. Every number on the death toll is more than just a statistical number; it is a life that shouldn’t have been taken for granted. If you can’t do it for yourself, do it for the 2,886,586 individuals who don’t get a second chance.
  • Nicholas Del Rosario, “Ephemeral,” 2021. Digital print, 40 x 3.125 inches.
  • Nicholas Del Rosario, detail of “Ephemeral” (receipt top), 2021. Digital print, 40 x 3.125 inches.
  • Nicholas Del Rosario, detail of “Ephemeral” (receipt totals), 2021. Digital print, 40 x 3.125 inches.
  • Nicholas Del Rosario, detail of “Ephemeral” (receipt bottom), 2021. Digital print, 40 x 3.125 inches.
  • Artist’s statement by Jennifer Escobar. In mid-2020, I was diagnosed with Bell's Palsy, a disorder that caused the left side of my face to be temporarily paralyzed. After weeks of recovery, I still suffered from lingering side effects of burning sensations and sharp pains pulsating underneath my skin. This painting is a reminder to myself that I’m not as weak as I think I am. In fact, I chose to make “Self-Portrait” on a 24 x 30 inch canvas as a chance to document the difficult and terrifying experience. In sharing my experience, perhaps I can bring some awareness to this disorder.
  • Jennifer Escobar, “Self-Portrait,” 2021. Oil paint and graphite on canvas, 30 x 24 inches.
  • Jennifer Escobar, detail of “Self-Portrait” (left cheek), 2021. Oil paint and graphite on canvas, 30 x 24 inches.
  • Jennifer Escobar, detail of “Self-Portrait” (right eye), 2021. Oil paint and graphite on canvas, 30 x 24 inches.
  • Jennifer Escobar, detail of “Self-Portrait” (fingers), 2021. Oil paint and graphite on canvas, 30 x 24 inches.
  • Artist’s statement by Amanuel Getachew. In the piece “Idea/Identity,” I wanted to honor the countless innocent men, women and children who’ve lost lives, homes and livelihoods in the current and ongoing conflicts that are happening all over my home country, Ethiopia.
  • Amanuel Getachew, “Idea/Identity,” 2021. Photographs, dimensions variable.
  • Amanuel Getachew, from “Idea/Identity” (left image), 2021. Photographs, dimensions variable.
  • Amanuel Getachew, from “Idea/Identity” (right image), 2021. Photographs, dimensions variable.
  • Artist’s statement by Zack Gibson. All human relationships, whether they are platonic, romantic, or familial, will come to an end. As our relationships die, so do past versions of ourselves. I struggle to accept the fact that nothing is forever, and I want to reflect that in my art. My piece “Memento Assemblage” is a documentation of my expired relationships. This piece suggests that death, both metaphorically and literally, is inevitable for everyone and everything.
  • Zack Gibson, still from “Memento Assemblage” (still 1), 2021. HD Video. TRT: 00:45.
  • Zack Gibson, still from “Memento Assemblage” (still 2), 2021. HD Video. TRT: 00:45.
  • Zack Gibson, still from “Memento Assemblage” (still 4), 2021. HD Video. TRT: 00:45.
  • Zack Gibson, still from “Memento Assemblage” (still 3), 2021. HD Video. TRT: 00:45.
  • Zack Gibson, still from “Memento Assemblage” (still 5), 2021. HD Video. TRT: 00:45.
  • Zack Gibson, still from “Memento Assemblage” (still 6), 2021. HD Video. TRT: 00:45.
  • Zack Gibson, still from “Memento Assemblage” (still 7), 2021. HD Video. TRT: 00:45.
  • Zack Gibson, still from “Memento Assemblage” (still 8), 2021. HD Video. TRT: 00:45.
  • Artist’s statement by André José Holguin. Through the frames of a photograph, and deciding what to include and what to exclude, I can create a scene for viewers to ponder. The idea that I can make people fixate on something by framing it in a photograph interests me, and hence why I have chosen it as a chief concern for my project. I am drawn toward the sense of a calming human presence in these images - this sense that someone is there or has been there - and how it is communicated without the clear visible presence of any human being.
  • André José Holguin, “Untitled,” 2021. Photographs, dimensions variable.
  • André José Holguin, detail of “Untitled” (first row), 2021. Photographs, dimensions variable.
  • André José Holguin, detail of “Untitled” (second row), 2021. Photographs, dimensions variable.
  • André José Holguin, detail of “Untitled” (third row), 2021. Photographs, dimensions variable.
  • André José Holguin, detail of “Untitled” (fourth row), 2021. Photographs, dimensions variable.
  • André José Holguin, detail of “Untitled” (first half of fifth row), 2021. Photographs, dimensions variable.
  • André José Holguin, detail of “Untitled” (second half of fifth row), 2021. Photographs, dimensions variable.
  • André José Holguin, detail of “Untitled” (sixth row), 2021. Photographs, dimensions variable.
  • André José Holguin, detail of “Untitled” (first half of seventh row), 2021. Photographs, dimensions variable.
  • André José Holguin, detail of “Untitled” (second half of seventh row), 2021. Photographs, dimensions variable.
  • André José Holguin, detail of “Untitled” (eight row), 2021. Photographs, dimensions variable.
  • André José Holguin, detail of “Untitled” (ninth row), 2021. Photographs, dimensions variable.
  • André José Holguin, detail of “Untitled” (bottom row), 2021. Photographs, dimensions variable.
  • Artist’s statement by Zoe Kihm. As I work to understand the world around me, I have begun with the process of self-reflection. I wanted to add to the conversation of self-acceptance, and through using mirrors as a medium I encourage the process of self-reflection as a participatory event. With primary colors as my palette and emphasis on prominent parts of my body, I root my message in the theme of the fundamentals, and invite contemplation over how you define your fundamental self in the process.
  • Zoe Kihm, “SA,” 2021. Acrylic paint on mirror panels, 12 x 12 inches each.
  • Zoe Kihm, “C,” 2021. Acrylic paint on mirror panel, 12 x 12 inches.
  • Zoe Kihm, detail of “C,” 2021. Acrylic paint on mirror panel, 12 x 12 inches.
  • Zoe Kihm, “T,” 2021. Acrylic paint on mirror panel, 12 x 12 inches.
  • Zoe Kihm, detail of “T,” 2021. Acrylic paint on mirror panel, 12 x 12 inches.
  • Zoe Kihm, “S,” 2021. Acrylic paint on mirror panel, 12 x 12 inches.
  • Zoe Kihm, detail of “S,” 2021. Acrylic paint on mirror panel, 12 x 12 inches.
  • Zoe Kihm, “R,” 2021. Acrylic paint on mirror panel, 12 x 12 inches.
  • Zoe Kihm, detail of “R,” 2021. Acrylic paint on mirror panel, 12 x 12 inches.
  • Artist’s statement by C. M. Lee. What kind of people are needed to make society function? What is the role of individuals in a larger society? These model-sized sculptures suggest how individuals with different perspectives might collaborate in a balancing act to sustain their fabricated community.
  • C. M. Lee, “Untitled Community,” 2021. Cardstock paper on foam core poster board with ink washed resin figures.
  • C. M. Lee, “House With Blue Door and Market” from “Untitled Community,” 2021. Cardstock paper on foam core poster board with ink washed resin figures, approximately 20 inches tall.
  • C. M. Lee, detail from “House With Blue Door and Market” from “Untitled Community,” 2021. Cardstock paper on foam core poster board with ink washed resin figures.
  • C. M. Lee, “Purple House and Library” from “Untitled Community,” 2021. Cardstock paper on foam core poster board with ink washed resin figures, approximately 20 inches tall.
  • C. M. Lee, detail from “Purple House and Library” from “Untitled Community,” 2021. Cardstock paper on foam core poster board with ink washed resin figures.
  • C. M. Lee, detail from “Purple House and Library” from “Untitled Community,” 2021. Cardstock paper on foam core poster board with ink washed resin figures.
  • C. M. Lee, “Red School House and House with Porch” from “Untitled Community,” 2021. Cardstock paper on foam core poster board with ink washed resin figures, approximately 21.5 inches tall.
  • C. M. Lee, detail from “Red School House and House with Porch” from “Untitled Community,” 2021. Cardstock paper on foam core poster board with ink washed resin figures.
  • Artist’s statement by Christy Anne Mora. I use art to keep the past from stealing my future. In my exploration of different types of art, I discovered my passion for making sculptures out of interesting materials. I started out with clay and expanded into multiple mediums including paint, recycled and manufactured materials, and anything I could get my hands on. For me, it is a freeing experience to play with different materials and to manipulate them to express my point of view.
  • Christy Anne Mora, (front) “Explosion,” 2021. Mixed media with plaster, plywood, and chicken wire, 29 x 17 X 19 inches.
  • Christy Anne Mora, (right) “Explosion,” 2021. Mixed media with plaster, plywood, and chicken wire, 29 x 17 X 19 inches.
  • Christy Anne Mora, (left) “Explosion,” 2021. Mixed media with plaster, plywood, and chicken wire, 29 x 17 X 19 inches.
  • Christy Anne Mora, detail of “Explosion,” 2021. Well fired clay and acrylic paint.
  • Christy Anne Mora, detail of “Explosion” (detail of textures), 2021.
  • Christy Anne Mora, detail of “Explosion,” 2021. Small bottles filled with green glass, representing the artist’s blessing.
  • Artist’s statement by Marie Amanda Nickey. The set of eight posters presents four main characters and four central locations from my original novel “Commission War.” Begun thirteen years ago, “Commission War” tells the story of two opposing World War I spies involved in a world chase and race against time. Through the use of a time machine, they accidentally involve two teenagers from the present, who also join their cause and chase.
  • Marie Amanda Nickey, “Character Montage,” 2021. Copic markers on mixed media poster, 11 x 14 inches.
  • Marie Amanda Nickey, “Character One Shot Major Allen Pinkerton,” 2021.Copic markers on mixed media poster paper, 14 x 11 inches.
  • Marie Amanda Nickey, “Character One Shot Zoe Crenshaw,” 2021.Copic markers on mixed media poster paper, 14 x 11 inches.
  • Marie Amanda Nickey, “Character One Shot Samuel Crenshaw,” 2021.Copic markers on mixed media poster paper, 14 x 11 inches.
  • Marie Amanda Nickey, “Character One Shot Rose Yesenia Karlovich,” 2021.Copic markers on mixed media poster paper, 14 x 11 inches.
  • Marie Amanda Nickey, “Location 1 New York 42nd St. Street Shot,” 2021.Copic markers and Sakura micron ink on canvas, 8 x10 inches.
  • Marie Amanda Nickey, “Location 2 Krasnoyarsk, Krai, Siberia, Russia, Railroad Station Street Shot,” 2021.Copic markers and Sakura micron ink on canvas, 8 x10 inches.
  • Marie Amanda Nickey, “Location 3 Hotel ARTE, Buenos Aires, Argentina Street Shot,” 2021.Copic markers and Sakura micron ink on canvas, 8 x10 inches.
  • Marie Amanda Nickey, “Location 4 Tokyo, Japan Street Shot,” 2021.Copic markers and Sakura micron ink on canvas, 8 x10 inches.
  • Artist’s statement by Alexus Elaine Raisty. My art is inspired by the nightmares of my own dark, twisted childhood. It is like me; it is cute until you see what is underneath - the dark truth of trauma and the ugly judgment I feel from the world. I use its adorability like candy as a deliberate tactic to lure in viewers. Though the images are cute, chibi-style, anime characters, they are not meant to be merely attractive, but also political so they can bluntly confront and address the horrific pain of physical, verbal and sexual abuse. I feel that the world we live in needs to start protecting children, not the abusers. I hope that this work inspires you to advocate for children by supporting the #MeToo movement, Bikers Against Child Abuse (B.A.C.A) and other organizations that stand up against child abuse.
  • Alexus Elaine Raisty, “Warning Label,” 2021. Acrylic, paint marker, gel pen, Sharpie, alcohol-based marker, ribbon, lace, thread, cloth, glue, ribbon roses, and hand sewn stuffie on canvas, 11 x 14 inches.
  • Alexus Elaine Raisty, detail of “Warning Label,” 2021.
  • Alexus Elaine Raisty, “Predator Octopus,” 2021. Acrylic, Glow in the dark Acrylic, Decorator glaze, paint marker, gel pen, Sharpie, crayon, dual brush pen, micron pen, alcohol-based marker, cut out newspaper letters, glue, thread, cloth, and hand sewn stuffie on canvas, 24 x 18 inches.
  • Alexus Elaine Raisty, detail of “Predator Octopus,” 2021.
  • Alexus Elaine Raisty, “One Too Many,” 2021. Acrylic, paint marker, Sharpie, dual brush pen, micron pen, alcohol-based marker, cut out Post-It-Notes, color printer paper,  elementary lined paper, glue, thread, cloth, band-aids, and hand sewn mini blanket on canvas, 24 x 18 inches.
  • Alexus Elaine Raisty, detail of “One Too Many,” 2021.
  • Alexus Elaine Raisty, “Proof of Purchase,” 2021. Acrylic, paint marker, Sharpie, gel pen, dual brush pen, micron pen,  alcohol-based marker, pencil, cut out newspaper barcodes, glue, thread, cloth, and hand sewn stuffies on canvas, 24 x 18 inches.
  • Alexus Elaine Raisty, detail of “Proof of Purchase,” 2021.
  • Alexus Elaine Raisty, “Heartfelt Sorrow,” 2021.  Acrylic, Sharpie, micron pen, alcohol-based marker, and hand sewn on empty paint tubes on canvas, 24 x 18 inches.
  • Alexus Elaine Raisty, detail of “Heartfelt Sorrow,” 2021.
  • Alexus Elaine Raisty, “42 Million,” 2021. Acrylic, paint marker, gel pen, Sharpie, dual brush pen, micron pen, alcohol-based marker, letter stickers, and gem stickers on canvas, 24 x 18 inches. Each gem represents 10,000 of the 42 million survivors.
  • Alexus Elaine Raisty, detail of “42 Million,” 2021.


Videos

babyparts, Digital Remains, TRT: 00:42
Dez DLT, The Visitor, TRT: 01:46
Nicholas Del Rosario, Ephemeral, TRT: 00:18
Zack Gibson, Memento Assemblage, TRT: 00:45


Statements

babyparts

www.digital-remains.com
What would you like to happen with your social media profile when you die?

Vincent Blair

As a young Black man that experiences the division between different ethnicities and cultures in America in real life and in the media, I feel driven to create work that expresses my desire for people to show more unity and love.

Dez DLT

The Visitor is a short claymation inspired by the cabin fever of the early days of quarantine. Although I’ve always known I was an introvert, COVID-19 restrictions have made me realize that I enjoyed socializing much more than I had thought. Like the character in The Visitor, I find myself ingesting brain numbing content in the privacy of my studio and avoiding the dangers of the outside world. This work aims to mimic the monotony of the past year; it emphasizes the slow and unnerving passage of time, questions the safety of the present, and expresses uncertainty of the future. Aside from recording a personal experience, The Visitor is my addition to the ever-growing black hole of brain-numbing content that we can all distract ourselves with when reality is a little bit too scary.

Nicholas Del Rosario

My piece is a tribute to the victims of this virus that had their livelihoods shortened as a result of negligent actions from the American government and the general populous. Every person who chooses not to wear a mask, not to quarantine, and not to follow government mandated regulations and guidelines were responsible for a digit at the end of this receipt. All life is temporary. People will continue to die, regardless of whether there is a pandemic, but to gamble with a life that is not one’s own is reprehensible. Every number on the death toll is more than just a statistical number; it is a life that shouldn’t have been taken for granted. If you can’t do it for yourself, do it for the 2,886,586 individuals who don’t get a second chance.

Jennifer Escobar

In mid-2020, I was diagnosed with Bell's Palsy, a disorder that caused the left side of my face to be temporarily paralyzed. After weeks of recovery, I still suffered from lingering side effects of burning sensations and sharp pains pulsating underneath my skin. This painting is a reminder to myself that I’m not as weak as I think I am. In fact, I chose to make Self-Portrait on a 24 x 30 inch canvas as a chance to document the difficult and terrifying experience. In sharing my experience, perhaps I can bring some awareness to this disorder.

Amanuel Getachew

In the piece Idea/Identity, I wanted to honor the countless innocent men, women and children who’ve lost lives, homes and livelihoods in the current and ongoing conflicts that are happening all over my home country, Ethiopia.

Zack Gibson

All human relationships, whether they are platonic, romantic, or familial, will come to an end. As our relationships die, so do past versions of ourselves. I struggle to accept the fact that nothing is forever, and I want to reflect that in my art. My piece Memento Assemblage is a documentation of my expired relationships. This piece suggests that death, both metaphorically and literally, is inevitable for everyone and everything.

André José Holguin

Through the frames of a photograph, and deciding what to include and what to exclude, I can create a scene for viewers to ponder. The idea that I can make people fixate on something by framing it in a photograph interests me, and hence why I have chosen it as a chief concern for my project. I am drawn toward the sense of a calming human presence in these images - this sense that someone is there or has been there - and how it is communicated without the clear visible presence of any human being.

Zoe Kihm

As I work to understand the world around me, I have begun with the process of self-reflection. I wanted to add to the conversation of self-acceptance, and through using mirrors as a medium I encourage the process of self-reflection as a participatory event. With primary colors as my palette and emphasis on prominent parts of my body, I root my message in the theme of the fundamentals, and invite contemplation over how you define your fundamental self in the process.

C. M. Lee

What kind of people are needed to make society function? What is the role of individuals in a larger society? These model-sized sculptures suggest how individuals with different perspectives might collaborate in a balancing act to sustain their fabricated community.

Christy Anne Mora

I use art to keep the past from stealing my future. In my exploration of different types of art, I discovered my passion for making sculptures out of interesting materials. I started out with clay and expanded into multiple mediums including paint, recycled and manufactured materials, and anything I could get my hands on. For me, it is a freeing experience to play with different materials and to manipulate them to express my point of view.

Marie Amanda Nickey

The set of eight posters presents four main characters and four central locations from my original novel Commission War. Begun thirteen years ago, Commission War tells the story of two opposing World War I spies involved in a world chase and race against time. Through the use of a time machine, they accidentally involve two teenagers from the present, who also join their cause and chase.

Alexus Elaine Raisty

My art is inspired by the nightmares of my own dark, twisted childhood. It is like me; it is cute until you see what is underneath - the dark truth of trauma and the ugly judgment I feel from the world. I use its adorability like candy as a deliberate tactic to lure in viewers. Though the images are cute, chibi-style, anime characters, they are not meant to be merely attractive, but also political so they can bluntly confront and address the horrific pain of physical, verbal and sexual abuse. I feel that the world we live in needs to start protecting children, not the abusers. I hope that this work inspires you to advocate for children by supporting the #MeToo movement, Bikers Against Child Abuse (B.A.C.A) and other organizations that stand up against child abuse.


Virtual Reception & Walk-Through