Student Invitational

Chaffey College and the Wignall Museum of Contemporary Art proudly present Student Invitational 2021, the 44th annual juried exhibition featuring Chaffey College student artists. In this rigorous program, the selected artists work closely with faculty, the museum curators and staff, and other art professionals to create a new body of work.

Guide



Gallery

  • Artist’s statement by babyparts. What would you like to happen with your social media profile when you die?
www.digital-remains.com
  • babyparts, graphic from “Digital Remains,” 2021. Website: www.digital-remains.com
  • 027_Facebook deleted my mom’s page immediately. I wish I could still visit it.
  • 021_I got control of my mother fb when she died. I would like my gf to have control over mine.
  • 005_Delete all my messages.
  • 030_I would like my account memorialized and my husband take control of my account.
  • Artist’s statement by Vincent Blair. As a young Black man that experiences the division between different ethnicities and cultures in America in real life and in the media, I feel driven to create work that expresses my desire for people to show more unity and love.
  • Vincent Blair, “Unity Project,” 2021. Oil and acrylic on canvas, wood, 24 x 25 inches.
  • Vincent Blair, detail of “Unity Project” (MAGA man), 2021. Oil and acrylic on canvas, wood, 24 x 25 inches.
  • Vincent Blair, detail of “Unity Project” (BLM man), 2021. Oil and acrylic on canvas, wood, 24 x 25 inches.
  • Vincent Blair, detail of “Unity Project” (hand), 2021. Oil and acrylic on canvas, wood, 24 x 25 inches.
  • Artist’s statement by Dez DLT. “The Visitor” is a short claymation inspired by the cabin fever of the early days of quarantine. Although I’ve always known I was an introvert, COVID-19 restrictions have made me realize that I enjoyed socializing much more than I had thought. Like the character in The Visitor, I find myself ingesting brain numbing content in the privacy of my studio and avoiding the dangers of the outside world. This work aims to mimic the monotony of the past year; it emphasizes the slow and unnerving passage of time, questions the safety of the present, and expresses uncertainty of the future. Aside from recording a personal experience, The Visitor is my addition to the ever-growing black hole of brain-numbing content that we can all distract ourselves with when reality is a little bit too scary.
  • Dez DLT, still from “The Visitor” (man on sofa), 2021. HD Video (stop-motion animation), TRT: 01:45.
  • Dez DLT, still from “The Visitor” (man turning TV off), 2021. HD Video (stop-motion animation), TRT: 01:45.
  • Dez DLT, still from “The Visitor” (man looking back), 2021. HD Video (stop-motion animation), TRT: 01:45.
  • Dez DLT, still from “The Visitor” (the visitor on sofa), 2021. HD Video (stop-motion animation), TRT: 01:45.
  • Dez DLT, still from “The Visitor” (man’s face), 2021. HD Video (stop-motion animation), TRT: 01:45.
  • Artist’s statement by Nicholas Del Rosario. My piece is a tribute to the victims of this virus that had their livelihoods shortened as a result of negligent actions from the American government and the general populous. Every person who chooses not to wear a mask, not to quarantine, and not to follow government mandated regulations and guidelines were responsible for a digit at the end of this receipt. All life is temporary. People will continue to die, regardless of whether there is a pandemic, but to gamble with a life that is not one’s own is reprehensible. Every number on the death toll is more than just a statistical number; it is a life that shouldn’t have been taken for granted. If you can’t do it for yourself, do it for the 2,886,586 individuals who don’t get a second chance.
  • Nicholas Del Rosario, “Ephemeral,” 2021. Digital print, 40 x 3.125 inches.
  • Nicholas Del Rosario, detail of “Ephemeral” (receipt top), 2021. Digital print, 40 x 3.125 inches.
  • Nicholas Del Rosario, detail of “Ephemeral” (receipt totals), 2021. Digital print, 40 x 3.125 inches.
  • Nicholas Del Rosario, detail of “Ephemeral” (receipt bottom), 2021. Digital print, 40 x 3.125 inches.
  • Artist’s statement by Jennifer Escobar. In mid-2020, I was diagnosed with Bell's Palsy, a disorder that caused the left side of my face to be temporarily paralyzed. After weeks of recovery, I still suffered from lingering side effects of burning sensations and sharp pains pulsating underneath my skin. This painting is a reminder to myself that I’m not as weak as I think I am. In fact, I chose to make “Self-Portrait” on a 24 x 30 inch canvas as a chance to document the difficult and terrifying experience. In sharing my experience, perhaps I can bring some awareness to this disorder.
  • Jennifer Escobar, “Self-Portrait,” 2021. Oil paint and graphite on canvas, 30 x 24 inches.
  • Jennifer Escobar, detail of “Self-Portrait” (left cheek), 2021. Oil paint and graphite on canvas, 30 x 24 inches.
  • Jennifer Escobar, detail of “Self-Portrait” (right eye), 2021. Oil paint and graphite on canvas, 30 x 24 inches.
  • Jennifer Escobar, detail of “Self-Portrait” (fingers), 2021. Oil paint and graphite on canvas, 30 x 24 inches.
  • Artist’s statement by Amanuel Getachew. In the piece “Idea/Identity,” I wanted to honor the countless innocent men, women and children who’ve lost lives, homes and livelihoods in the current and ongoing conflicts that are happening all over my home country, Ethiopia.
  • Amanuel Getachew, “Idea/Identity,” 2021. Photographs, dimensions variable.
  • Amanuel Getachew, from “Idea/Identity” (left image), 2021. Photographs, dimensions variable.
  • Amanuel Getachew, from “Idea/Identity” (right image), 2021. Photographs, dimensions variable.
  • Artist’s statement by Zack Gibson. All human relationships, whether they are platonic, romantic, or familial, will come to an end. As our relationships die, so do past versions of ourselves. I struggle to accept the fact that nothing is forever, and I want to reflect that in my art. My piece “Memento Assemblage” is a documentation of my expired relationships. This piece suggests that death, both metaphorically and literally, is inevitable for everyone and everything.
  • Zack Gibson, still from “Memento Assemblage” (still 1), 2021. HD Video. TRT: 00:45.
  • Zack Gibson, still from “Memento Assemblage” (still 2), 2021. HD Video. TRT: 00:45.
  • Zack Gibson, still from “Memento Assemblage” (still 3), 2021. HD Video. TRT: 00:45.
  • Zack Gibson, still from “Memento Assemblage” (still 4), 2021. HD Video. TRT: 00:45.
  • Zack Gibson, still from “Memento Assemblage” (still 5), 2021. HD Video. TRT: 00:45.
  • Zack Gibson, still from “Memento Assemblage” (still 6), 2021. HD Video. TRT: 00:45.
  • Zack Gibson, still from “Memento Assemblage” (still 7), 2021. HD Video. TRT: 00:45.
  • Zack Gibson, still from “Memento Assemblage” (still 8), 2021. HD Video. TRT: 00:45.
  • Artist’s statement by André José Holguin. Through the frames of a photograph, and deciding what to include and what to exclude, I can create a scene for viewers to ponder. The idea that I can make people fixate on something by framing it in a photograph interests me, and hence why I have chosen it as a chief concern for my project. I am drawn toward the sense of a calming human presence in these images - this sense that someone is there or has been there - and how it is communicated without the clear visible presence of any human being.
  • André José Holguin, “Untitled,” 2021. Photographs, dimensions variable.
  • André José Holguin, detail of “Untitled” (first row), 2021. Photographs, dimensions variable.
  • André José Holguin, detail of “Untitled” (second row), 2021. Photographs, dimensions variable.
  • André José Holguin, detail of “Untitled” (third row), 2021. Photographs, dimensions variable.
  • André José Holguin, detail of “Untitled” (fourth row), 2021. Photographs, dimensions variable.
  • André José Holguin, detail of “Untitled” (first half of fifth row), 2021. Photographs, dimensions variable.
  • André José Holguin, detail of “Untitled” (second half of fifth row), 2021. Photographs, dimensions variable.
  • André José Holguin, detail of “Untitled” (sixth row), 2021. Photographs, dimensions variable.
  • André José Holguin, detail of “Untitled” (first half of seventh row), 2021. Photographs, dimensions variable.
  • André José Holguin, detail of “Untitled” (second half of seventh row), 2021. Photographs, dimensions variable.
  • André José Holguin, detail of “Untitled” (eight row), 2021. Photographs, dimensions variable.
  • André José Holguin, detail of “Untitled” (ninth row), 2021. Photographs, dimensions variable.
  • André José Holguin, detail of “Untitled” (bottom row), 2021. Photographs, dimensions variable.
  • Artist’s statement by Zoe Kihm. As I work to understand the world around me, I have begun with the process of self-reflection. I wanted to add to the conversation of self-acceptance, and through using mirrors as a medium I encourage the process of self-reflection as a participatory event. With primary colors as my palette and emphasis on prominent parts of my body, I root my message in the theme of the fundamentals, and invite contemplation over how you define your fundamental self in the process.
  • Zoe Kihm, “SA,” 2021. Acrylic paint on mirror panels, 12 x 12 inches each.
  • Zoe Kihm, “C,” 2021. Acrylic paint on mirror panel, 12 x 12 inches.
  • Zoe Kihm, detail of “C,” 2021. Acrylic paint on mirror panel, 12 x 12 inches.
  • Zoe Kihm, “T,” 2021. Acrylic paint on mirror panel, 12 x 12 inches.
  • Zoe Kihm, detail of “T,” 2021. Acrylic paint on mirror panel, 12 x 12 inches.
  • Zoe Kihm, “S,” 2021. Acrylic paint on mirror panel, 12 x 12 inches.
  • Zoe Kihm, detail of “S,” 2021. Acrylic paint on mirror panel, 12 x 12 inches.
  • Zoe Kihm, “R,” 2021. Acrylic paint on mirror panel, 12 x 12 inches.
  • Zoe Kihm, detail of “R,” 2021. Acrylic paint on mirror panel, 12 x 12 inches.
  • Artist’s statement by C. M. Lee. What kind of people are needed to make society function? What is the role of individuals in a larger society? These model-sized sculptures suggest how individuals with different perspectives might collaborate in a balancing act to sustain their fabricated community.
  • C. M. Lee, “Untitled Community,” 2021. Cardstock paper on foam core poster board with ink washed resin figures.
  • C. M. Lee, “House With Blue Door and Market” from “Untitled Community,” 2021. Cardstock paper on foam core poster board with ink washed resin figures, approximately 20 inches tall.
  • C. M. Lee, detail from “House With Blue Door and Market” from “Untitled Community,” 2021. Cardstock paper on foam core poster board with ink washed resin figures.
  • C. M. Lee, “Purple House and Library” from “Untitled Community,” 2021. Cardstock paper on foam core poster board with ink washed resin figures, approximately 20 inches tall.
  • C. M. Lee, detail from “Purple House and Library” from “Untitled Community,” 2021. Cardstock paper on foam core poster board with ink washed resin figures.
  • C. M. Lee, detail from “Purple House and Library” from “Untitled Community,” 2021. Cardstock paper on foam core poster board with ink washed resin figures.
  • C. M. Lee, “Red School House and House with Porch” from “Untitled Community,” 2021. Cardstock paper on foam core poster board with ink washed resin figures, approximately 21.5 inches tall.
  • C. M. Lee, detail from “Red School House and House with Porch” from “Untitled Community,” 2021. Cardstock paper on foam core poster board with ink washed resin figures.
  • Artist’s statement by Christy Anne Mora. I use art to keep the past from stealing my future. In my exploration of different types of art, I discovered my passion for making sculptures out of interesting materials. I started out with clay and expanded into multiple mediums including paint, recycled and manufactured materials, and anything I could get my hands on. For me, it is a freeing experience to play with different materials and to manipulate them to express my point of view.
  • Christy Anne Mora, (front) “Explosion,” 2021. Mixed media with plaster, plywood, and chicken wire, 29 x 17 X 19 inches.
  • Christy Anne Mora, (right) “Explosion,” 2021. Mixed media with plaster, plywood, and chicken wire, 29 x 17 X 19 inches.
  • Christy Anne Mora, (left) “Explosion,” 2021. Mixed media with plaster, plywood, and chicken wire, 29 x 17 X 19 inches.
  • Christy Anne Mora, detail of “Explosion,” 2021. Well fired clay and acrylic paint.
  • Christy Anne Mora, detail of “Explosion” (detail of textures), 2021.
  • Christy Anne Mora, detail of “Explosion,” 2021. Small bottles filled with green glass, representing the artist’s blessing.
  • Artist’s statement by Marie Amanda Nickey. The set of eight posters presents four main characters and four central locations from my original novel “Commission War.” Begun thirteen years ago, “Commission War” tells the story of two opposing World War I spies involved in a world chase and race against time. Through the use of a time machine, they accidentally involve two teenagers from the present, who also join their cause and chase.
  • Marie Amanda Nickey, “Character Montage,” 2021. Copic markers on mixed media poster, 11 x 14 inches.
  • Marie Amanda Nickey, “Character One Shot Major Allen Pinkerton,” 2021.Copic markers on mixed media poster paper, 14 x 11 inches.
  • Marie Amanda Nickey, “Character One Shot Zoe Crenshaw,” 2021.Copic markers on mixed media poster paper, 14 x 11 inches.
  • Marie Amanda Nickey, “Character One Shot Samuel Crenshaw,” 2021.Copic markers on mixed media poster paper, 14 x 11 inches.
  • Marie Amanda Nickey, “Character One Shot Rose Yesenia Karlovich,” 2021.Copic markers on mixed media poster paper, 14 x 11 inches.
  • Marie Amanda Nickey, “Location 1 New York 42nd St. Street Shot,” 2021.Copic markers and Sakura micron ink on canvas, 8 x10 inches.
  • Marie Amanda Nickey, “Location 2 Krasnoyarsk, Krai, Siberia, Russia, Railroad Station Street Shot,” 2021.Copic markers and Sakura micron ink on canvas, 8 x10 inches.
  • Marie Amanda Nickey, “Location 3 Hotel ARTE, Buenos Aires, Argentina Street Shot,” 2021.Copic markers and Sakura micron ink on canvas, 8 x10 inches.
  • Marie Amanda Nickey, “Location 4 Tokyo, Japan Street Shot,” 2021.Copic markers and Sakura micron ink on canvas, 8 x10 inches.
  • Artist’s statement by Alexus Elaine Raisty. My art is inspired by the nightmares of my own dark, twisted childhood. It is like me; it is cute until you see what is underneath - the dark truth of trauma and the ugly judgment I feel from the world. I use its adorability like candy as a deliberate tactic to lure in viewers. Though the images are cute, chibi-style, anime characters, they are not meant to be merely attractive, but also political so they can bluntly confront and address the horrific pain of physical, verbal and sexual abuse. I feel that the world we live in needs to start protecting children, not the abusers. I hope that this work inspires you to advocate for children by supporting the #MeToo movement, Bikers Against Child Abuse (B.A.C.A) and other organizations that stand up against child abuse.
  • Alexus Elaine Raisty, “Warning Label,” 2021. Acrylic, paint marker, gel pen, Sharpie, alcohol-based marker, ribbon, lace, thread, cloth, glue, ribbon roses, and hand sewn stuffie on canvas, 11 x 14 inches.
  • Alexus Elaine Raisty, detail of “Warning Label,” 2021.
  • Alexus Elaine Raisty, “Predator Octopus,” 2021. Acrylic, Glow in the dark Acrylic, Decorator glaze, paint marker, gel pen, Sharpie, crayon, dual brush pen, micron pen, alcohol-based marker, cut out newspaper letters, glue, thread, cloth, and hand sewn stuffie on canvas, 24 x 18 inches.
  • Alexus Elaine Raisty, detail of “Predator Octopus,” 2021.
  • Alexus Elaine Raisty, “One Too Many,” 2021. Acrylic, paint marker, Sharpie, dual brush pen, micron pen, alcohol-based marker, cut out Post-It-Notes, color printer paper,  elementary lined paper, glue, thread, cloth, band-aids, and hand sewn mini blanket on canvas, 24 x 18 inches.
  • Alexus Elaine Raisty, detail of “One Too Many,” 2021.
  • Alexus Elaine Raisty, “Proof of Purchase,” 2021. Acrylic, paint marker, Sharpie, gel pen, dual brush pen, micron pen,  alcohol-based marker, pencil, cut out newspaper barcodes, glue, thread, cloth, and hand sewn stuffies on canvas, 24 x 18 inches.
  • Alexus Elaine Raisty, detail of “Proof of Purchase,” 2021.
  • Alexus Elaine Raisty, “Heartfelt Sorrow,” 2021.  Acrylic, Sharpie, micron pen, alcohol-based marker, and hand sewn on empty paint tubes on canvas, 24 x 18 inches.
  • Alexus Elaine Raisty, detail of “Heartfelt Sorrow,” 2021.
  • Alexus Elaine Raisty, “42 Million,” 2021. Acrylic, paint marker, gel pen, Sharpie, dual brush pen, micron pen, alcohol-based marker, letter stickers, and gem stickers on canvas, 24 x 18 inches. Each gem represents 10,000 of the 42 million survivors.
  • Alexus Elaine Raisty, detail of “42 Million,” 2021.

Videos

babyparts, Digital Remains, TRT: 00:42
Dez DLT, The Visitor, TRT: 01:46
Nicholas Del Rosario, Ephemeral, TRT: 00:18
Zack Gibson, Memento Assemblage, TRT: 00:45

 

Statements

babyparts

www.digital-remains.com
What would you like to happen with your social media profile when you die?

Vincent Blair

As a young Black man that experiences the division between different ethnicities and cultures in America in real life and in the media, I feel driven to create work that expresses my desire for people to show more unity and love.

Dez DLT

The Visitor is a short claymation inspired by the cabin fever of the early days of quarantine. Although I’ve always known I was an introvert, COVID-19 restrictions have made me realize that I enjoyed socializing much more than I had thought. Like the character in The Visitor, I find myself ingesting brain numbing content in the privacy of my studio and avoiding the dangers of the outside world. This work aims to mimic the monotony of the past year; it emphasizes the slow and unnerving passage of time, questions the safety of the present, and expresses uncertainty of the future. Aside from recording a personal experience, The Visitor is my addition to the ever-growing black hole of brain-numbing content that we can all distract ourselves with when reality is a little bit too scary.

Nicholas Del Rosario

My piece is a tribute to the victims of this virus that had their livelihoods shortened as a result of negligent actions from the American government and the general populous. Every person who chooses not to wear a mask, not to quarantine, and not to follow government mandated regulations and guidelines were responsible for a digit at the end of this receipt. All life is temporary. People will continue to die, regardless of whether there is a pandemic, but to gamble with a life that is not one’s own is reprehensible. Every number on the death toll is more than just a statistical number; it is a life that shouldn’t have been taken for granted. If you can’t do it for yourself, do it for the 2,886,586 individuals who don’t get a second chance.

Jennifer Escobar

In mid-2020, I was diagnosed with Bell's Palsy, a disorder that caused the left side of my face to be temporarily paralyzed. After weeks of recovery, I still suffered from lingering side effects of burning sensations and sharp pains pulsating underneath my skin. This painting is a reminder to myself that I’m not as weak as I think I am. In fact, I chose to make Self-Portrait on a 24 x 30 inch canvas as a chance to document the difficult and terrifying experience. In sharing my experience, perhaps I can bring some awareness to this disorder.

Amanuel Getachew

In the piece Idea/Identity, I wanted to honor the countless innocent men, women and children who’ve lost lives, homes and livelihoods in the current and ongoing conflicts that are happening all over my home country, Ethiopia.

Zack Gibson

All human relationships, whether they are platonic, romantic, or familial, will come to an end. As our relationships die, so do past versions of ourselves. I struggle to accept the fact that nothing is forever, and I want to reflect that in my art. My piece Memento Assemblage is a documentation of my expired relationships. This piece suggests that death, both metaphorically and literally, is inevitable for everyone and everything.

André José Holguin

Through the frames of a photograph, and deciding what to include and what to exclude, I can create a scene for viewers to ponder. The idea that I can make people fixate on something by framing it in a photograph interests me, and hence why I have chosen it as a chief concern for my project. I am drawn toward the sense of a calming human presence in these images - this sense that someone is there or has been there - and how it is communicated without the clear visible presence of any human being.

Zoe Kihm

As I work to understand the world around me, I have begun with the process of self-reflection. I wanted to add to the conversation of self-acceptance, and through using mirrors as a medium I encourage the process of self-reflection as a participatory event. With primary colors as my palette and emphasis on prominent parts of my body, I root my message in the theme of the fundamentals, and invite contemplation over how you define your fundamental self in the process.

C. M. Lee

What kind of people are needed to make society function? What is the role of individuals in a larger society? These model-sized sculptures suggest how individuals with different perspectives might collaborate in a balancing act to sustain their fabricated community.

Christy Anne Mora

I use art to keep the past from stealing my future. In my exploration of different types of art, I discovered my passion for making sculptures out of interesting materials. I started out with clay and expanded into multiple mediums including paint, recycled and manufactured materials, and anything I could get my hands on. For me, it is a freeing experience to play with different materials and to manipulate them to express my point of view.

Marie Amanda Nickey

The set of eight posters presents four main characters and four central locations from my original novel Commission War. Begun thirteen years ago, Commission War tells the story of two opposing World War I spies involved in a world chase and race against time. Through the use of a time machine, they accidentally involve two teenagers from the present, who also join their cause and chase.

Alexus Elaine Raisty

My art is inspired by the nightmares of my own dark, twisted childhood. It is like me; it is cute until you see what is underneath - the dark truth of trauma and the ugly judgment I feel from the world. I use its adorability like candy as a deliberate tactic to lure in viewers. Though the images are cute, chibi-style, anime characters, they are not meant to be merely attractive, but also political so they can bluntly confront and address the horrific pain of physical, verbal and sexual abuse. I feel that the world we live in needs to start protecting children, not the abusers. I hope that this work inspires you to advocate for children by supporting the #MeToo movement, Bikers Against Child Abuse (B.A.C.A) and other organizations that stand up against child abuse.

 

Virtual Reception & Walk-Through