David Bunn: Here, There and (nearly) Everywhere
January 5 – February 12, 2005




ARTISTS' TALK:

Thursday, January 20, 6:30-7:30 p.m.
ARTISTS' RECEPTION:
Thursday, January 20, 7:30-9:00 p.m.
EVENT INFO: (909) 941-2702, www.chaffey.edu/wignallgallery

HOURS:
Monday-Friday, 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. and Saturday, noon – 4:00 p.m.

David Bunn acquired the roughly seven million cards that made up the Los Angeles Central Library’s now-obsolete card catalogue in 1990. Since that time, he has been using those cards (as well as the decommissioned card catalogues from other libraries that have come in to his possession) to create text poems comprised only of book titles, bibliographic entries and the like. Each poem is constructed by beginning at some point in the catalogue, and reading the titles of the cards sequentially. For example, in this found poem from the Liverpool card catalogue: “It was like this/It was the nightingale/It was twenty years ago today” we can see how accidental associations based on nothing more than alphabetical order become the primary lens for interpreting meaning.

The cards themselves seem at once familiar and antiquated—faded, yellowing, and stained from being thumbed through by so many hundreds of fingertips. These physical cues add to the story the cards tell. Worn corners and other signs of heavy use distinguish the card that reads, “You are not alone.” A yellowed card with faded type reads “This is an old story.” Other cards that look bright and untouched read “Look at me! Try me! I’m new!” In fact, perhaps more than anything else, it is the faded type on the “It was the nightingale” card that gives that poem its wistful tone.

Deft and conceptually rigorous, Bunn’s work is also tinged with sadness for the passing of these historical bodies of material, now eclipsed by on-line systems. In this technological era, the paper cards seem bulky to the eye, suggesting inefficiency. They recall a time when information, not yet reduced to a microchip, required physical volume, a time when seeking information meant a physical task that was both methodical and open to surprise or accident.

David Bunn: Here, There, and (nearly) Everywhere will be on view starting Wednesday January 5 and run through Saturday, February 12, 2005. David Bunn will be giving an artist’s talk on Thursday, January 20 at 6:30 pm and the reception will follow the talk at 7:30. The exhibition, artist’s talk, and reception are free and open to the public.

The Wignall Museum/Gallery is located at 5885 Haven Avenue, Rancho Cucamonga, CA 91737-3002. Admission is free. Parking is free in lot #5 in visitor’s parking spots with a parking permit. Permits are available in the gallery office.