faculty senate
CURRICULUM AND SCHEDULES - Sections in Alphabetical Order:

CCH - REVIEW OF COURSE OUTLINES OF RECORD - GOOD PRACTICES

GOOD PRACTICE IN COURSE OUTLINES OF RECORD
Excerpted from Good Practice Documents from the
Academic Senate of the California Community Colleges

          The outline of record must reflect a quality in the course sufficient to obtain the objectives.  To do this the outline must be complete, that is, contain all the elements specified in 55002(a)(3): unit value, scope, objectives, and content.  The outline must also include types and examples of assignments, instructional methodology, and methods of evaluation.  It must be rigorous and effective in integrating throughout the outline the required components of critical thinking, essay writing/problem solving, and college level skills and vocabulary.  An integrated approach is one in which each element appears throughout the objectives, is covered in the course content, is reflected in comprehensive assignments, is taught using an effective methodology, and serves as an essential part of the evaluation of student performance.  Citations of texts and other reading material must be current, that is, reflect the present knowledge of skills and principles upon which the course is founded.

          The college must commit the resources, both in terms of staff and facilities, to assure the feasibility of offering the course with sufficient frequency to maintain course objectives--at least every two years.  Lastly, the course must comply with any other applicable laws such as those related to classes for those with disabilities

          The central component of the outline is the course content [topics].  This section should include a complete listing of the topics taught in the course.  They should be arranged by major headings with subtopics.  The content may include the perspective from which topics are taught, such as “social aspects of mammal hunting tactics.”

          The outline must also specify assignments, instructional methodology, and methods of evaluation, although in these sections only types and examples are required.  This is an important distinction.  Objectives and content in the course outline are required of all instructors.  Individual instructors are, however, free to use different assignments and methodology as long as the types they use are equivalent (in covering course content and achieving student outcomes) to those illustrated in the course outline.  This section also requires types of reading assignments, that is, texts and other instructional materials.  Again, not all instructors must use the same text, but a complete list of the types used should be included in the course outline.  This is difficult to achieve given that instructors change texts and other reading assignments regularly.  Many colleges meet this requirement by maintaining a complete list of required material in the bookstore and/or library and then make reference to this list in the course outline.  (When they are to be reviewed by those outside the college, the course outlines must, of course, have such reading assignments appended.)

          The type or examples of methods of instruction should be specifically related to the course objectives.  They should provide real guidance to instructors in designing their class sessions.  For example, rather than stating “lecture” the description might be “lecture and demonstration by instructor, with in-class practice, including feedback, coaching, and evaluation by the instructor.”

          Assignments should be directly related to the objectives of the course.  They should be specific enough to provide real guidance to faculty and clear expectations for students.  A description of the type or examples of assignments is required.  For example, rather than “term paper” state “term paper comparing and contrasting the social aspects of the hunting tactics of two mammal species.”  This section must establish that the work is demanding enough in rigor and independence to fulfill the credit level specified.  The nature of the assignments must clearly demand critical thinking.  Assignments should be adequate to assure that students who successfully complete them can meet the objectives of the course.  Appropriate out-of-class work is required for credit courses. 

          Types and examples of methods of evaluation should be listed.  This section should be substantively related to the stated objectives of the course.  The evaluation must clearly show that critical thinking skills are required.  Types or examples should be extensive enough to show that all course objectives are evaluated.  Statements in this section should clearly show the basis for grading.  For example, “term paper shows topic coverage, basis of comparison, and critical analysis.”

          The catalog description should clearly state the scope of the course, its level, and what kinds of student goals the course is designed to fulfill.  For example, state “designed for engineering majors.”  It should be evident from the catalog description that no two courses in the curriculum are redundant.

          Local and statewide approvals are based partly on an evaluation of need.  One aspect of need is showing that the course plays a role in the curriculum that no other course fulfills effectively.  Need statements are critical for innovative courses.  Need can be demonstrated in a number of ways.

  • The course is required for completion of an associate degree, a certificate, or an articulated transfer program.
  • The course meets an associate degree and/or transferable general education requirement in a specific area not adequately covered by another course.
  • The course meets a specified need of industry as detailed by an industry advisory committee or survey of employers.
  • The course provides an alternative route to meet goals specified in other courses by students unable to benefit as fully from those other courses.  (In such cases it should be made clear that the student cannot receive credit for both courses.)
  • The course makes productive use of particular strengths the college has to offer and is in demand by students with transfer or occupational goals.
  • The course meets an innovative subject matter or instructional need­.

          The outline must state the objectives of the course, that is, what students will have learned upon successfully completing the course.  “Boiler plate” is strenuously discouraged!  Objectives should use active verbs for observable behaviors.  They must establish that critical thinking is an integral part of the course.  For example, rather than “describe animal hunting behavior” state “compare and contrast social aspects of hunting tactics of major mammals.”

Title 5, Section 55002.  Standards and Criteria for Courses and Classes 1.  Associate Degree Applicable Courses
The college and/or district curriculum committee shall recommend approval of the course for associate degree credit if it meets the following standards:
(a) Associate Degree Credit Course.  An associate degree credit course is a course which has been designated as appropriate to the associate degree in accordance with the requirements of Section 55805.5 and which has been recommended by the college and/or district curriculum committee and approved by the district governing board as a collegiate course meeting the needs of the students eligible for admission.
(2) The college and/or district curriculum committee shall recommend approval of the course for associate degree credit if it meets the following standards:
55805.5.  Types of Courses Appropriate to the Associate Degree.
The criteria established by the governing board of a community college district to implement its philosophy on the associate degree shall permit only courses that conform to the standards specified in Section 55002 (a) and that fall into the following categories to be offered for associate degree credit:
(a) All lower division courses accepted toward the baccalaureate degree by the California State University or University of California or designed to be offered for transfer.
(b) Courses that apply to the major in non-baccalaureate occupational fields.
(c) English courses not more than one level below the first transfer level composition course, typically known as English 1A.  Each student may count only one such course as credit toward the associate degree.
(d) All mathematical courses above and including Elementary Algebra.
(e) Credit courses in English and mathematics taught in or on behalf of other departments and which, as determined by the local governing board, require entrance skills at a level equivalent to those necessary for the courses specified in sections (c) and (d) above.

Grading Policy.
The course provides for measurement of student performance in terms of the stated course objectives and culminates in a formal, permanently recorded grade based upon uniform standards in accordance with section 55758 of this Division.  The grade is based on demonstrated proficiency in subject matter and the ability to demonstrate that proficiency, at least in part, by means of essays, or in courses where the curriculum committee deems them to be appropriate, by problem solving exercises or skills demonstrations by students.
3. Units.  The course grants units of credit based upon a relationship specified by the governing board, between the number of units assigned to the course and the number of lecture and/or laboratory hours or performance criteria specified in the course outline.  The course also requires a minimum of three hours of work per week, including class time for each unit of credit, prorated for short-term, laboratory and activity courses.
4.  Intensity.  The course treats subject matter with a scope and intensity that require students to study independently outside of class time.
5.  Prerequisites and Corequisites.  When the college and/or district curriculum committee, determines, based on a review of the course Outline of Record, that a student would be highly unlikely to receive a satisfactory grade unless the student has knowledge or skills not taught in the course, then the course shall require prerequisites or corequisites that are established, reviewed, and applied in accordance with the requirements of Article 2.5 (commencing with section 55200) of this Subchapter.
6.   Basic Skills Requirements.  If success in the course is dependent upon communication or computational skills, then the course shall require, consistent with the provisions of Article 2.5 (commencing with section 55200) of this Subchapter, as prerequisites or corequisites eligibility for enrollment in associate degree credit courses in English and/or mathematics, respectively.
7.  Difficulty.  The course work calls for critical thinking and the understanding and application of concepts determined by the curriculum committee to be at college level.
8.  Level.  The course requires learning skills and a vocabulary that the curriculum committee deems appropriate for a college course.
(3) Course Outline of Record. The course is described in a course outline of record that shall be maintained in the official college files and made available to each instructor. The course outline of record shall specify the unit value, scope, objectives, and content in terms of a specific body of knowledge. The course outline shall also specify types or provide examples of required reading and writing assignments, other outside-of-class assignments, instructional methodology, and methods of evaluation for determining whether the stated objectives have been met by students.
(5) Repetition. Repeated enrollment is allowed only in accordance with provisions of Chapter 2 (commencing with Section 51000), sections 55761-55763 and 58161 of this Division.
58161. State Apportionment for Course Repetition (cont'd)
. . . (d) State apportionment for repetition of courses not expressly authorized by this section may be claimed in accordance with the following procedure:
(1) The district must identify the courses which are to be repeatable, and designate such courses in its catalog.
(2) The district must determine and certify that each identified course is one in which the course content differs each time it is offered, and that the student who repeats it is gaining an expanded educational experience for one of the following reasons:
(A) Skills or proficiencies are enhanced by supervised repetition and practice within class periods; or
(B) Active participatory experience in individual study or group assignments is the basic means by which learning objectives are obtained.

  Print the Section    < back to The Curriculum Handbook

CCH - REVIEW OF COURSE OUTLINES OF RECORD - LEVELS OF REVIEW

LEVELS OF REVIEW FOR COURSE OUTLINE OF RECORD MODIFICATIONS

To streamline the course approval process, it should be recognized that not all changes in the course outline of record are of equal impact.  Different levels of review are required for different types of changes.

Modifications Requiring Full Review by the Curriculum Committee: Substantive Changes

Full curriculum committee review should apply only to those changes which require re-evaluation of criteria to ensure that standards in Title 5 and the Curriculum Standards Handbook continue to be met.  Such changes include the following:

  • major change in catalog description, objectives, or content that does one of the following:
      • changes the need or justification for the course
      • raises questions about the revised course’s compliance with Title 5 regulations or the Chancellor’s office mandates
  • change in units and hours
  • change in number of repetitions
  • change in credit/no credit status
  • change in requisites or advisories (separate review required by Title 5 §55200)
  • adaptation for distance education mode (separate review required by Title 5 §55376)
  • change to experimental status
  • changes submitted as “imminent need”

Modifications That Can Be Approved on the Consent Agenda: Minor Changes

Changes which do not affect statutory or regulatory curriculum standards, but require judgment of the extent to which this is true, can be placed on the consent agenda for full committee vote.  Members of the full curriculum committee are expected to read the revised and previous course outlines and the accompanying rationale.  They may pull the item from the consent agenda for discussion if necessary.  Otherwise, no comment is needed prior to a full committee vote.  The following are considered minor changes:

  • minor, non-substantive changes in catalog description, objectives, or content (for example, rewording for clarity or style)
  • changes in course numbers
  • changes in course titles
  • courses being added to or dropped from an associate degree or certificate program of two years or less duration
  • courses being added to or dropped from an associate degree general education list.

Modifications That Constitute Information Items Only (No Action Required) or Technical Changes

  • Some changes are technical in nature and require no review.  Others are within the areas of the course outline for which a variety of methods are permissible, provided that the course objectives are met and the course content covered.  It is recommended that the following changes be accepted as information items only, with no action required, upon the advice of the division/departmental faculty or curriculum subcommittee review.  Such changes include the following: 
  • changes in term length (as long as the Carnegie relationship is maintained)
  • changes in the text and/or instructional materials list
  • changes in the sections on methods of instruction, assignments, or methods of evaluation (as long as these changes are minor and continue to enable students to meet objectives and fully cover the stated content)
  • addition of a focus area to a special topics course list for the next letter in the sequence
  Print the Section    < back to The Curriculum Handbook

CCH - REVIEW OF COURSE OUTLINES OF RECORD - ELEMENTS OF REVIEW

ELEMENTS OF REVIEW FOR NEW COURSE PROPOSALS AND SUBSTANTIVE MODIFICATIONS

  1. Have all areas been completed?
  2. Is the course number appropriate for the level of study required in the course?
  3. Is the course number consistent with discipline sequence (if applicable)?
  4. Is the course title consistent with discipline sequence (if applicable)?
  5. Is the course title a clear indication of the content of the course?
  6. Are the required type and number of units appropriate for this course?
  7. Are  requisites in the appropriate category (Prerequisite, Corequisite, Advisory, Limitation on Enrollment)?
  8. Are the requisites are appropriate for the course?
  9. Has the appropriate level of scrutiny been applied (i.e.: data scrutiny results or content review)?
  10. Does the catalog description make the content and goals of the course clear?
  11. Is the catalog description consistent with descriptions for similar courses in the discipline (if any)?
  12. Is the catalog description sufficiently differentiated from a similar existing course (if any)?
  13. Is the catalog description appropriately worded, spelled, and punctuated?
  14. Do options for course repetition (if any) meet Title 5 guidelines?
  15. Is the content consistent with the course title and catalog description?
  16. Does the content reflect college-level work?
  17. Is the content appropriate for the discipline placement?
  18. Is the content outline clear and consistent?
  19. Is the content outline appropriately worded, spelled, and punctuated?
  20. Do the course objectives specify measurable student outcomes?
  21. Do the objectives incorporate higher order (critical thinking) verbs?
  22. Are the course objectives clearly stated and differentiated?
  23. Are the instructional methods appropriate to the course content and objectives?
  24. Are the instructional methods appropriate for the course type and discipline?
  25. Do the assignments clearly relate to the course objectives?
  26. Have examples of assignments been included?
  27. Do the assignments require critical thinking?
  28. For lecture courses, do the assignments require students to do substantial work outside of class (i.e., two hours of homework for each hour of class)?
  29. Do the evaluation methods correlate with the objectives, content, scope, and intensity of the course?
  30. Are the texts and other resources appropriate for the course level, objectives, instructional methods, and assignments?
  31. Are the most recent editions of texts and references listed?
  32. Are the requests for A.A./A.S. credit or transfer appropriate?
  33. Have three comparable courses been designated? (New courses only)
  34. Does the course meet the Chancellor’s criteria for community college courses? (New courses only)
  Print the Section    < back to The Curriculum Handbook

CCH - REVIEW OF COURSE OUTLINES OF RECORD - TAXONOMY OF VERBS

TAXONOMY OF COGNITIVE ACTION VERBS

 

Critical Thinking

Knowledge
arrange
choose
cite
define
describe
duplicate
find
group
identify
label
list
locate
match
memorize
name
outline
pick
point to
quote
recall
recite
recognize
record
relate
repeat
reproduce
say
select
show
sort
spell
state
tally
tell
underline
write

Comprehension
alter
calculate
choose
cite examples of
comment
convert
define
demonstrate
describe
differentiate
discriminate
discuss
expand
explain
expound on
express
give examples of
identify
illustrate
indicate
infer
interpret
locate
paraphrase
predict
project
propose
qualify
rearrange
recognize
report
restate
review
select
spell out
submit
tell
trace
transform
translate

Application
adopt
apply
capitalize
change
choose
collect
construct
demonstrate
develop
discover
dramatize
employ
exercise
generalize
illustrate
interpret
make use of
manipulate
modify
operate
organize
practice
predict
put in action
put to use
relate
schedule
show
sketch
solve
try
use
utilize
wield

Analysis
analyze
appraise
audit
break down
calculate
categorize
check
compare
contrast
criticize
debate
deduce
diagram
differentiate
discriminate
dissect
distinguish
evaluate
examine
experiment
include
infer
inspect
inventory
look into
question
reason
relate
screen
search
separate
sift
simplify
solve
study
subdivide
summarize
survey
take apart
test
test for

Synthesis
arrange
assemble
blend
build
collect
combine
compile
compose
conceive
construct
create
design
develop
devise
effect
form
formulate
generate
make
make up
manage
modify
organize
plan
prepare
produce
propose
rearrange
reconstruct
reorganize
restructure
set up
show relationship to
structure
synthesize
write

Evaluation
accept
appraise
assess
award
censure
choose
classify
compare
conclude
contrast
criticize
critique
decide
decree
determine
estimate
evaluate
grade
interpret
judge
justify
measure
prioritize
rank
rate
reject
revise
rule on
score
select
settle
summarize
validate
value
weigh

  Print the Section    < back to The Curriculum Handbook

CCH - REQUISITES, ADVISORIES, & LIMITATIONS ON ENROLLMENT - GOOD PRACTICES

PREREQUISITES, COREQUISITES, ADVISORIES ON RECOMMENDED PREPARATION, AND OTHER LIMITATIONS ON ENROLLMENT
(Based on Good Practice for the Implementation of Prerequisites, Bill Scroggins et al, 1997; and The Model District Policy on Prerequisites, Corequisites, and Advisories on Recommended Preparation, BOG, 1993)

PREREQUISITES: Coursework, skills, or other preparation without which a student is “highly unlikely” to succeed in a given course.  Prerequisites are required, may be used to block registration, and must be completed before enrollment in the target course. 

There are three primary categories of prerequisites:

Standard Prerequisites
: Prerequisites for transferable courses that are well-recognized within the discipline.  For example, English 1A as a prerequisite for a philosophy course.

Sequential Prerequisites: Prerequisites within or across disciplines in which courses are clearly designed to be taken a part of a sequence, usually within a vocational program.  For example, chemistry as a prerequisite for pharmacology.  Includes courses that are “standard” but do not fall within the “standard prerequisite” category because they fall outside the transferable course track.  Excludes prerequisite courses in communication or computation, which require separate validation.

Communication or Computation and Non-Course Prerequisites: Out-of-sequence communication or computation courses or non-course skills.  For example, reading as a history prerequisite, calculus as a physics prerequisite, recency, or assessment scores in English or math.

COREQUISITES: Courses that are so intertwined that a student cannot reasonable pass either class without the other.  Corequisites are required, may be used to block registration, and must be taken concurrently with the target course or completed before enrollment in the target course.

There are two primary categories of corequisites:

Two-Way Corequisites: Paired courses in which the content of both courses is interdependent.  By far the most common two-way corequisites are lecture/lab combinations.  For example, a chemistry lecture course paired with the equivalent chemistry lab.  Two-way corequisites are assumed to be taken concurrently.

One-Way Corequisites:  Ancillary courses whose content is dependent on a target course that can stand alone.  For example, an optional astronomy lab that complements an astronomy lecture course.  The lecture course is necessary for students to complete the astronomy field work, but the lab course is not essential for a student to pass the lecture course.  One-way corequisites may be taken either concurrently or previously, assuming the target course is taken first.  In the example above, the astronomy courses could either be taken concurrently or the lecture course could be taken first.

ADVISORIES ON RECOMMENDED PREPARATION: Coursework, skills, or other preparation without which a student is may have difficulty succeeding in a given course.  Advisories are suggested rather than required and may not be used to block registration.   Advisories serve as an alternative to requisites when discipline faculty determine that the designated preparation will significantly improve student performance but the preparation does not meet the level of scrutiny required for requisites.   Advisories are also useful for potential prerequisites that have not yet been validated and for preparation that is difficult to validate by existing measures (such as typing ability or experience with a calculator).

OTHER LIMITATIONS ON ENROLLMENT: Limitations on enrollment that may be used in special circumstances to limit which students may enroll in particular courses or programs, so long as that limitation is clarified by stated policies and fair, equitable procedures.  Such limitations may not block student access to degrees or certificates, must be reviewed every six years, and should not have a disproportionate impact on historically underrepresented groups.

Common limitations, in addition to the categories above (prerequisites and corequisites) include the following:

Practical Limitations: Facilities limitations, faculty workload, budget, etc.

Registration Limitations:  First-come, first-served registration or priority registration for specialized groups.

Statutory, Regulatory, or Contractual Requirements: Registration requirements mandated by licensing agencies or other legal entities.

Intercollegiate Competition: Athletic or other team competitions for which a course is specifically designed.

Honors Courses: Course that admit only those students who meet prescribed academic standards.   May be modifications of existing courses or uniquely designed courses.

Public Performance Courses: Courses that require a successful audition, typically within the context of the performing arts.

Cohort Courses: Course sections designed for a particular group of students, such as the Puente Program or EOPS.  Such sections may either be exclusive (only students in the cohort may register) or suggestive (targeted for students in the cohort).

Health and Safety Requirements: Requirements such as a TB test that ensure the health of students enrolling in the class and of those they may come in contact with.  This is a common limitation in nursing and education classes.

Program of Study Admission: Some courses are available only to students who meet the requirements for admission into a particular program. Students cannot enroll until they have been admitted to the appropriate program. Program admission is a common limitation for health programs such as nursing.

  Print the Section    < back to The Curriculum Handbook

CCH - REQUISITES, ADVISORIES, & LIMITATIONS ON ENROLLMENT - LEVELS OF SCRUTINY

LEVELS OF SCRUTINY: PREREQUISITES AND COREQUISITES

A.  Standard Requisites

  1. Discipline Consensus: Discipline faculty agreement, by informal voiced consensus or formal vote, that the requisite is essential to student success in the particular course.  Consensus must be reached only after careful examination of syllabi, course assignments, and course exams.
  2. Reviewed on Six-Year Cycle: Mandatory review every six years for retention, deletion, or move to Advisory on Recommended Preparation.
  3. Content Review: List of entry skills for target course that would be met by prerequisite or list of essential skills unique to corequisite.
  4. Three or More Comparable Prerequisites: Documentation from three or more UC or CSU courses with comparable prerequisite for equivalent course.
  5. Curriculum Committee Approval: Formal vote to approve requisites only after requisites have met the appropriate level of scrutiny.  Should be considered separately rather than holistically as a course component.   May be modified as conditional approval for maximum of two years while necessary criteria are being validated.

B.  Sequential Requisites

  1. Discipline Consensus: Discipline faculty agreement, by informal voiced consensus or formal vote, that the requisite is essential to student success in the particular course.  Consensus must be reached only after careful examination of syllabi, course assignments, and course exams.
  2. Reviewed on Six-Year Cycle: Mandatory review every six years for retention, deletion, or move to Advisory on Recommended Preparation.
  3. Content Review: Comparison of entry skills for target course with objectives for prerequisite course or correlation of corequisite objectives with target course objectives.
  4. Curriculum Committee Approval: Formal vote to approve requisites only after requisites have met the appropriate level of scrutiny.  Should be considered separately rather than holistically as a course component.   May be modified as conditional approval for maximum of two years while necessary criteria are being validated.

C.  Communication or Computation/Non-Course Requisites

  1. Discipline Consensus: Discipline faculty agreement, by informal voiced consensus or formal vote, that the requisite is essential to student success in the particular course.  Consensus must be reached only after careful examination of syllabi, course assignments, and course exams.
  2. Reviewed on Six-Year Cycle: Mandatory review every six years for retention, deletion, or move to Advisory on Recommended Preparation.
  3. Content Review: Comparison of entry skills for target course with objectives for prerequisite course or correlation of corequisite objectives with target course objectives.
  4. Research Validation: Data collection, usually by the research unit of the college, demonstrating that students who have not met a requisite are “highly unlikely to succeed” when compared to students who meet the requisite.  Typical ratios are two to one, meaning twice as likely to succeed when requisite is met.  Usual period for data collection is one year; two years maximum if first year data is inconclusive.
  5. Curriculum Committee Approval: Formal vote to approve requisites only after requisites have met the appropriate level of scrutiny.  Should be considered separately rather than holistically as a course component.   May be modified as conditional approval for maximum of two years while necessary criteria are being validated.

LEVELS OF SCRUTINY: ADVISORIES AND OTHER LIMITATIONS

A.  Advisories

  1. Discipline Consensus: Discipline faculty agreement, by informal voiced consensus or formal vote, that the requisite is essential to student success in the particular course.  Consensus must be reached only after careful examination of syllabi, course assignments, and course exams.
  2. Reviewed Periodically: Mandatory review according to college policy for retention or deletion.
  3. Content Review: List of entry skills for target course that would be met by advisory.
  4. Curriculum Committee Approval: Formal vote to approve requisites only after requisites have met the appropriate level of scrutiny.  Should be considered separately rather than holistically as a course component.   May be modified as conditional approval for maximum of two years while necessary criteria are being validated.

 B.  Other Limitations

  1. Discipline Consensus: Discipline faculty agreement, by informal voiced consensus or formal vote, that the requisite is essential to student success in the particular course.  Consensus must be reached only after careful examination of syllabi, course assignments, and course exams.
  2. Reviewed Periodically: Mandatory review according to college policy for retention or deletion.
  3. Curriculum Committee Approval: Formal vote to approve requisites only after requisites have met the appropriate level of scrutiny.  Should be considered separately rather than holistically as a course component.   May be modified as conditional approval for maximum of two years while necessary criteria are being validated.
  Print the Section    < back to The Curriculum Handbook

CCH - REQUISITES, ADVISORIES, & LIMITATIONS ON ENROLLMENT - STATISTICAL STANDARDS

STATISTICAL STANDARDS FOR ESTABLISHING THE NECESSITY AND APPROPRIATENESS OF PREREQUISITES (State Guidelines)

Statistical Analysis Procedures and Standards

1) The minimum required data collection sample size for statistical analysis to establish a prerequisite or corequisite for a specific course should be at least 100 students, including at least 20 students in the data collection research sample who did not meet the prerequisite or corequisite requirement.

2) Analysis of data collected through appropriate prerequisite research design procedures should indicate a statistically significant difference between students that have met the prerequisite or corequisite for the course and students that have not met prerequisite or corequisite with respect to the selected “student success” outcome measure.

3) Data will be analyzed using a comparison matrix. The chi-square statistical value obtained in such a comparison provides evidence as to whether a systematic relationship exists between variables. By comparing the two groups, students that have met the prerequisite or corequisite and students that have not met the prerequisite or corequisite, this statistical procedure determines whether or not the observed difference between the two groups with respect to the “student success” outcome measure is statistically significant. Even when the collection of empirical data may indicate differences between students that have met or not met the prerequisites as statistically significant, this observed difference may not be significant or meaningful on a practical level.

4) In order to evaluate the practical significance of an observed statistical difference between the two groups of students, the data table comparison matrix will be examined to determine direct evidence as to the actual practical impact of the proposed prerequisite or corequisite.
Results should indicate

a. an overall course success rate (grades dichotomized as “C” or better) of less than 33% for students that have not met the prerequisite or corequisite
and
b. a greater than a “2-to-1” ratio between the proportion of students that met the prerequisite or corequisite and were successful in the course compared to students that had not met the prerequisite or corequisite and were successful.

These two conditions concerning course success rates represent the operational definition or statistical equivalent of the regulation criterion of “highly unlikely to succeed” that is to be used to demonstrate the necessity and appropriateness of a prerequisite or corequisite.

5) The necessity and appropriateness of the prerequisite or corequisite will have been demonstrated and justified if data analysis results for either the final grade or an alternative “student success” outcome measure selected indicate

a.  a statistically significant difference between students that have met and have not met the proposed prerequisite or corequisite with respect to the selected outcome measure,
and
b.  practical impact of the proposed prerequisite or corequisite

Data analysis results for the  second outcome measure should provide “supportive” evidence. Under these conditions, data analysis results will be presented to the curriculum committee by the institutional researcher with a recommendation for approval of the proposed prerequisite or corequisite. If observed data analysis results for final grade and alternative “student success” outcome measure are seriously “divergent” with respect to statistical significance or practical impact, the institutional researcher will present all data analysis results to the curriculum committee for review and evaluation without a specific recommendation concerning approval of the proposed prerequisite or corequisite.

6) If the data analysis for either the final grade or an alternative “student success” outcome measure indicates a statistically significant difference between students that have and have not met the proposed prerequisite or corequisite, but a sufficient degree of practical impact is not indicated, data analysis results will be presented to the curriculum committee by the institutional researcher with a recommendation that the proposed prerequisite or corequisite be considered for approval only as an advisory on recommended preparation for the course.

  Print the Section    < back to The Curriculum Handbook

CCH - REQUISITES, ADVISORIES, & LIMITATIONS ON ENROLLMENT - TITLE 5 REGULATIONS

APPLICABLE TITLE 5 REGULATIONS

Challenges


I.B. Regulation
Section 55201(e) requires that colleges have a challenge process, provide challenge at least on several specified grounds, and inform students of their rights.

Approval

I.C.3.a.(4) Regulation
Section 55002 requires that courses be approved only if they meet specific criteria established for degree credit courses, non-degree applicable credit courses, non-credit courses, or community services classes. Subsections (a)(2)(D) and (a)(2)(E) of Section 55002 require further that courses that should have prerequisites to ensure academic standards may only be approved as degree applicable courses provided that the criteria have been met for establishing the needed prerequisites.

I.C.3.a.(4)(C) Regulation
Section 55002(a) specifies conditions a course must meet before a curriculum committee may approve it for degree applicable credit. Subsections 55002(a)(2)(D) and (E) specify that establishing a prerequisite or corequisite is a condition for approval if “a student would be highly unlikely to receive a satisfactory grade unless the student has knowledge or skills not taught in the course,” or “success in the course is dependent upon communication or computation skills.”

Scrutiny

II.A.1. Regulation
Section 55201(b)(1) requires that there be different levels of scrutiny for different types of prerequisites and corequisites. The policy must state explicitly what these levels are and for which types of prerequisites and corequisites they will be used. In addition, Section 55201(c)(2) requires that the standard of scrutiny for any course be that a student who lacked “the skills, concepts, and/or information” would be “highly unlikely to receive a satisfactory grade in the course,” namely a grade of “CR” or “C” or better as determined by content review alone or with data collection or other scrutiny.

Advisories

II.B. Regulation
See also 1.C. A properly constituted curriculum committee and content review are required. An explicit statement of the content review process is crucial and also that the content review process be careful and the specific steps of that process be clearly specified in the policy. It is also crucial that the approval of the advisory be done explicitly and not be inferred from the approval of the course. Lastly, it is also crucial that provision be made for providing those with expertise on the discipline in question an adequate voice in the content review process.

Purview

I.C.1. Regulation
A curriculum committee established by mutual agreement of the administration and the senate is required. However, the committee may be either “a committee of the academic senate or a committee which includes faculty and is otherwise comprised in a way that is mutually agreeable to the college and/or district administration and the academic senate.” [Title 5, Section 55002(a)(1)]

CRUCIAL CONSIDERATIONS

The Chancellor’s Office considers the following instructions crucial to satisfactory implementation of Title 5 regulations. Colleges may change these crucial parts as they draft their own local policies. However, they must submit a rationale for any changes in the crucial areas of the model, and those changes require the approval of the Chancellor.

Dissemination of Information

I.A. Crucial
  The college must be required to provide clear and unambiguous information at least in the catalog and schedule defining prerequisites, corequisites, and advisories on recommended preparation, explaining the differences between these terms, explaining student rights to challenge prerequisites and corequisites or to enroll despite lacking the preparation recommended in the advisory, and listing every prerequisite or corequisite which will be enforced.

Periodic Review

I.D. Crucial
  Section 55201(b)(3) requires that prerequisites and corequisites be reviewed at least once every six years. The regulation only requires that advisories be reviewed periodically. However, it is crucial that the district policy specify some reasonable frequency for reviewing advisories.

Purview

I.C.2. Crucial
  Title 5, Sections 53200-204 mandates that prerequisites are one of the issues on which a board must “consult collegially” with the academic senate. The specific language of the model is the counsel of the drafting committee but is not required.

Approval

I.C.3. Crucial
  Section 55201(b)(1) requires that there be content review as part of the process for establishing any prerequisite, corequisite, or advisory. It is crucial that there be a careful content review process and that the specific steps of that process are clearly specified in the policy. It is also crucial that the approval of the prerequisite or corequisite (or advisory) be done explicitly and not be inferred from the approval of the course. Lastly, it is also crucial that provision be made for providing those with expertise on the discipline in question an adequate voice in the content review process.

II.A.1.c., d., g. Crucial  It is crucial that data be required at least for establishing these types of prerequisites and corequisites. It is also crucial that the policy specify how data will be gathered and evaluated and however it is done be consistent with sound research practices. Further, it is crucial that the policy state what the criteria will be for determining whether the data do in fact justify the establishing of the prerequisite or corequisite. Lastly, the policy must specify that a prerequisite may be put into effect before the required data have been collected only when the prerequisite is determined by the curriculum committee to be necessary pursuant to Section 55002(a)(2)(D) or (E) or other provisions of law, and that the period during which such a provisional prerequisite could be in effect be no longer than two years.

II.C. Crucial  Section 58106 lists the only ways it is permissible to limit enrollment. In addition, it is crucial that the policy specify an adequate voice for experts in the discipline on the specific limitations mentioned in the model and that these limitations be permitted only if the student would have other ways to meet any associate degree graduation requirement. Lastly, it is also crucial that such limitations be reviewed regularly and that the policy specify a reasonable schedule for such review.

Impact

II.C.1.c. Crucial
  It is crucial that courses which have try-out or audition as a means for permitting students to enroll in the course also be reviewed for whether the try-out or audition is having a disproportionate impact on any historically underrepresented group. (Section 55512 requires that “Any assessment instrument, method or procedure” must be evaluated for “disproportionate impact on particular groups of students described in terms of ethnicity, gender, age or disability, as defined by the Chancellor.”)

Implementation

I.E. Crucial
  It is crucial that there be an explicit statement of how prerequisites, corequisites, and limitations on enrollment will be implemented. It is also crucial that the implementation not be left exclusively to each individual classroom faculty member and that it be clear in what way the registration process will be used for this implementation.

Instructor Agreement

I.F. Crucial
  Section 55201(b)(2) requires that there be procedures for assuring that any course for which there is a prerequisite or corequisite will be taught in a manner that fits with the documents on the basis of which the prerequisite or corequisite was established.

  Print the Section    < back to The Curriculum Handbook

CCH - DISTANCE EDUCATION - CHAFFEY COLLEGE REVIEW

CHAFFEY COLLEGE CURRICULUM COMMITTEE
REVIEW AND APPROVAL OF DISTANCE EDUCATION COURSES

Courses must undergo separate review and approval before being offered for the first time in a distance education modality.
Distance education approvals must be updated every three years to reflect changes in technology.
Proposals may be submitted for approval in one of categories:
    * Online and Hybrid Delivery
    * Hybrid Delivery Only
    * Other Modality (e.g., CIW delivery)
Each distinct modality requires separate approval.
The course outline of record must be current (updated within the previous five years) before a proposal for distance education approval can be submitted.

  Print the Section    < back to The Curriculum Handbook

CCH - DISTANCE EDUCATION - STATE CRITERIA

DISTANCE EDUCATION PRIMER FOR CURRICULUM REVIEW
State Mandated Criteria

Definition of Distance Education

  1. Instruction is delivered by any one of several technological modes (online, videotapes, teleconferencing, etc.)
  2. Students and instructors are separated by physical distance at least part of the time

Required Curriculum Committee Review

  1. Distance education classes must be separately reviewed and approved by the Curriculum Committee
      1. before they are offered for the first time
      2. when course content, technology, or requirements are significantly modified
  2. Separate review applies to
      1. courses offered only in D.E. modality
      2. D.E. delivery of existing courses
  3. Review includes regulations and guidelines applicable to all courses, including compliance and good practice requirements.
  4. Review follows standard college process:
      1. new course proposal for uniquely D.E. courses
      2. modification proposal for existing courses being modified for D.E. delivery
    1. *Note: If the COR for an existing course reflects significant changes in the topics or objectives, or if D.E. delivery significantly alters the nature of the course experience, the course must be submitted as a new course with a unique course outline.

Sections of the COR Requiring Revision for D.E. Delivery

  1. Methods of instruction (including provisions for instructor-student contact)
  2. Assignments
  3. Methods of Evaluation
  4. Textbooks and Instructional Materials

Additional Elements Requiring Review

  1. Need
      1. How does course serve the needs of the college?
      2. How will it enhance student learning opportunities?
  2. Access
      1. Will additional populations be served? 
      2. Is reasonable access to equipment and services available to students?
      3. Are provisions in place for ADA compliance?
  3. Feasibility
      1. Are sufficient equipment, materials, technical support, and training in place?
      2. Will the course put significant additional demands on college resources?
  4. Type and frequency of instructor-student contact
      1. How will instructors and students interact? 
      2. How often will they interact with one another?
      3. Will instructor be reasonably available to students?
  5. Carnegie unit equivalence
      1. Will units be computed by week or by semester? 
      2. How many hours will be required for lecture-equivalent activities? 
      3. How many for other assignments? 
      4. How will these hours be tracked?
  Print the Section    < back to The Curriculum Handbook

CCH - DISTANCE EDUCATION - GOOD PRACTICE

GOOD PRACTICE RECOMMENDATIONS FOR CURRICULUM REVIEW OF D.E. COURSES from the Academic Senate of California Community Colleges

In reviewing D.E. courses, Curriculum Committees should:
Evaluate effective instructor-student contact as its first priority.
Verify that instructor-student contact is defined in terms of specific times and methods.
Verify that information transfer is well-planned, effective, and student-friendly.
Identify specific instructional methodologies and evaluate the time distribution among these methodologies
Verify that evaluation techniques accurately and equitably measure student participation and performance.
Verify that ADA requirements have been met.
Verify that adequate support personnel, media services, hardware, and software are in place.
Verify that adequate provision has been made for uninterrupted access to the delivery system.
Verify that technical support is available for both instructors and students.
• Curriculum Offices are required to maintain the following records of D.E. approval:
  • documentation demonstrating “regular, effective” contact between students and instructors in D.E. courses.
  • records showing separate approval for any course with technology-mediated instruction of 51% or more.
  • CORs for D.E. courses showing modifications appropriate for D.E. delivery.

  Print the Section    < back to The Curriculum Handbook

CCH - DISTANCE EDUCATION - UNITS / CONTACT HOURS

DISTANCE EDUCATION: UNITS AND STUDENT CONTACT HOURS

CCC Academic Senate’s Good Practices for Course Approval Processes, Spring 1998:

Further recommendations are made for policies and practices related to Carnegie units:

  1. separate standards and procedures for determining student units and faculty load,
  2. establish standards for granting Carnegie units to courses based on performance criteria (open entry/open exit, independent study, and distance education), and
  3. assure that the Board policy establishes expectations for the unit/hour relationship but maintains flexibility.
The relationship that three hours of student work per week over the term of a full semester equates to one Carnegie Unit of student credit is established in regulation.  Translation of these weekly hours to in-class lecture/lab/studio/activity/discussion and out-of-class homework/study/activities is left to local governing board policy.  The expansion of modes of delivery, short-term courses, and open-entry/open-exit designs has generated some new issues worthy of discussion.

CCC Academic Senate’s The Curriculum Committee: Role, Structure, Duties, and Standards of Good Practice, 1996:

Approval of Credit Hours: The Carnegie Unit
In reviewing and approving courses, curriculum committees must assure that the units offered are commensurate with the hours necessary for the course, both in and out of the classroom (Title 5  §55002 cited above). This is known as the Carnegie unit relationship, the essence of which requires a normative commitment of the student's time of 3 hours per week per unit of credit.  Clearly some students will put in more or less time, depending on their ability and level of personal commitment; however, the structure of the course in terms of semester or quarter units presumes this normative standard and is the basis of scheduling within the academic calendar.  The course outline of record will state student units and the number of in-class contact hours, which are 50-minutes in length. 

CCC Academic Senate’s Guidelines for Good Practice: Effective Instructor-Student Contact in Distance Learning, 1999

CURRICULUM COMMITTEE IMPLEMENTATION

In the words of the 1995 Academic Senate position paper Curriculum Committee Review of Distance Learning Courses and Sections:

Curriculum committees must make a judgment as to the quality of the course based on a review of the appropriateness of the methods of presentation, assignments, evaluation of student performance, and instructional materials.  Are these components adequate to achieve the stated objectives of the course?

This statement, of course, applies to curriculum committee evaluation of any course.  More particularly, the purpose of curriculum committee review of distance education course proposals should be to assure that both information transfer and instructor-student interaction are well planned.  The review process should be designed to document this assurance.

The information transfer portion would normally be covered in traditional sections of the course outline on Student Objectives and Course Content.  For example, this might well specify the number of hours spent studying material from a CD-ROM and should show the correct relationship to the Carnegie Units of credit for the class. (See for example, Appendix 1 and Appendix 4.) 

An example of an “effective” model:

2.  Methods of Instruction:  Instructor-Student Contact

Regular Contact                               
Please indicate type and number of instructor-student contacts per semester and why you feel this will be effective.

e-mail communication
Individual                                           2 - 10                     Via listserve                       _____
Via Chatroom                                    4 - 6                        Via Bulletin Board           _____
Via FAQS                                             ____

Telephone contacts                                          4 - 6
Orientation sessions (in person)                 1  (2 hrs, mandatory)
Group meetings (in person)                          4  (2 hrs each, mandatory)
Review session (in person)                           1  (2 hrs, optional)
Other (describe)                                                               
Contact with the instructor is to have four forms:

  1. A minimum of five on-campus meetings:  orientation at the beginning of the semester, a midterm examination, two lecture classes on material not covered by the CD-ROMs and a final examination,
  2. Messages sent between the instructor and student via computer within the mathematics software,
  3. E-mail sent between the instructor and student, and
  4. Weekly real-time individual and group conferences via a web-based chat room.

Hours for Content Delivery and Interaction
Please show the approximate hours anticipated for student activities.

5 CD-ROMs                                                         =  60 hrs               supplants normal lecture format

5   Mandatory meetings:
1 orientation session,                                                              sessions designed to assist students
1 mid-term exam,                                                                     in understanding assignments and
2 lecture sessions                                                                      enable instructor to evaluate
1 final exam                                                =  10 hrs               student progress

1    Optional meeting to review                                                   sessions designed to assist students
for exams, lecture on selected                                              in learning difficult material
topics                                                            =  2 hrs

Total      =  72 hrs

Guidelines for Good Practice: Technology Mediated Instruction, 1997:
Good Practice Emphasizes Quality Time on Task
Chickering and Ehrmann (1996)

A major issue raised by this time-on-task discussion is that of the relationship of units earned to time in the classroom.  The Carnegie formula which suggests that a combination of in-class and out-of-class assignments should equal three hours per week for one unit of credit is generally cited as the standard for instruction.  The relationship of time on task to units is less clear in a technology-mediated learning mode.  So is the connection between classroom hours and faculty load.  Generally, 15 lecture hours per week equate to a full teaching load.  When one spends no hours at all in classroom teaching how should one's load be determined?  Clearly, new or redefined relationships are needed.  Curriculum groups will need to propose new approaches to calculating contact hours, seat time, student units as well as unions will need to establish new definitions of faculty load and apportionment.

  Print the Section    < back to The Curriculum Handbook




CCH - FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

FREQUENTLY ASKED CURRICULUM QUESTIONS

What is the difference between a course’s title and its short title?
“Title” refers to the full title of the course for the College Catalog; e.g.: “Microsoft Access Database Design and Development.”  The title can have a maximum of 68 characters.  “Short Title” refers to the abbreviated version used in the Schedule of Classes; e.g.: “Access Design and Development.”  The short title can have a maximum of 30 characters.

What length and style should the catalog description be?
Catalog descriptions vary somewhat among different disciplines.  Review the current catalog for description content and style consistent with other courses in your discipline.

What are the different course types that I can choose among at Chaffey?

  • Lecture classes consist primarily of lecture and discussion and are usually scheduled in standard time modules.
  • Scheduled Laboratories also meet during standard, scheduled time modules.      
  • Arranged Hour: Self-Paced Laboratories allow students to complete assignments on their own time, at their own pace, in an instructor-supervised campus lab.   Student must enroll in these classes during the regular registration period.
  • Arranged Hour: Open Entry Laboratories are Self-Paced laboratories that students may enter any time during  the semester.
  • Arranged Hour: Neither of Above Laboratories require students to complete their work in a supervised lab during variable hours determined by their instructor.
  • Lecture/Lab classes have their lecture and lab portions scheduled in the same module.
  • Studio classes are a combination of lecture and activity, usually associated with the arts.
  • Work Experience/Cooperative Education classes offer college credit for supervised workplace experience.  These classes are sometimes referred to as “Internship” or “Externship.”             
  • Independent/Directed Study classes are individual variable-hour studies arranged directly with  the instructor.

How do I calculate student hours per unit for different types of classes?
All student hours are calculated according to the Carnegie unit, which requires three hours of work per week for one unit of credit.

  • Each lecture unit requires two hours of outside assignments for every hour in class.  For example, a three unit lecture course requires three hours in class and six hours of homework per week.
  • Lab units are earned during class hours; students are required to complete few or no outside assignments.  For example, a three unit lab course requires nine hours in class per week with no assigned homework.
  • Lecture/Lab courses calculate lecture units and lab units separately and total them.  For example, a four unit lecture /lab course requires three hours in class and six hours of homework per week to equal three lecture units.  Another three hours in class per week equals one lab unit. 
  • Studio units require one hour of outside assignments for every hour in class.  For example, a two unit studio course requires three hours in class and three hours of homework per week.
  • Paid Work Experience gives students one unit of credit for every 75 hours of paid, supervised work experience.
  • Unpaid Work Experience gives students one unit of credit for every 60 hours of unpaid, supervised work experience.

How many times can a course be repeated for credit?
Title 5 allows repetition of credit courses  only when the course is specifically intended to build skills or to change focus; i.e., a class in theater in which the student shifts focus from lighting to sets to make-up, etc., in subsequent semesters.  Four is the maximum number of times a credit course may be taken unless special circumstances apply.  Non-credit courses have no maximum number of repetitions; students may repeat them as many times as they choose.

What numbering system does Chaffey use to designate course level?
0 to 99 designate courses that apply to a Chaffey certificate or degree and are also transferable to four-year colleges.
400 to 499 designate courses that apply to a Chaffey certificate or degree but are not transferable.
500 to 599 designate pre-collegiate courses that are not Degree or Certificate Applicable or transferable.
600 to 699 designate non-credit courses that are not graded or transcripted.  To be classified as non-credit, the course must meet one of the Chancellor’s nine non-credit categories: Parenting, Elementary or Secondary Basic Skills, English As a Second Language, Citizenship, Substantial Disability, Short Term Vocational, Older Adults, Home Economics, or Health and Safety.

What grading options are available for my classes?
Credit courses may have a letter grade option, a Credit/No Credit option, or both.  Non-Credit courses are not graded and do not appear on a student’s transcript.

How many objectives should my course have?
There is no required number.  However, individual courses typically contain ten to fifteen objectives.

Do I need to use any special language for my student objectives?
Yes.  Objectives must contain cognitive action verbs.  The majority of objectives for transfer-level courses should contain higher level critical thinking verbs.  For examples, consult “Taxonomy of Cognitive Verbs.”

Should I list every course topic in the content section?
No.  Focus on core topics that all instructors will be expected to cover.  The order and emphasis of these topics will vary from instructor to instructor; individual instructors may also include appropriate topics that are not on the list.  Where applicable, indicate ranges of choices; for example, “one of the major Shakespearean tragedies, such as Hamlet, Othello, Macbeth, or King Lear.”

Must instructors use all the methods of instruction and evaluation specified in the COR?
No.  Choose the instruction and evaluation methods your discipline recommends for teaching this course.  Individual instructors may choose from among these methods, according to experience and pedagogical philosophy.  All methods should be appropriate for course type (e.g., “lecture” is not an appropriate instructional method for a laboratory course, nor would an essay be used to evaluate a pronunciation class).

Why do I divide my out-of-class assignments into categories such as reading and writing?
Title 5 specifies that certain categories of assignments should be included in a college course.  Not all categories, however, will apply to every course.  For example, a math course might not require writing assignments.  The range and type of assignments should reflect unit type; e.g., a lecture course requires outside assignments of 36 hours per semester for each unit of credit.  Conversely, a lab course requires minimal outside work.

Why must I include examples of assignments?  Must all instructors use these same assignments?
Title 5 requires that course outlines specify assignments; however, specific class assignments will vary by instructor.  Examples are included as a way of demonstrating the rigor and critical thinking expected in a typical reading, writing, or problem-solving assignment  for the course.  Transferable courses should include sample assignments that require greater skill and more critical thinking than non-transferable courses.

Why must my textbooks be less than five years old?
When transfer courses are evaluated by four year colleges, they routinely examine the textbook list to make certain the course is up to date.  Occupational course textbook lists need to demonstrate currency in the marketplace.  Sometimes, however, an older text remains the best choice for a particular class.  If you wish to include a text that is more than five years old, use an asterisk to indicate  that the book is a classic in the field.

How do I demonstrate that my course meets the Chancellor’s approval criteria
Review the criteria and then provide a brief narrative summary of the criteria that apply to your course.

What is the difference between a prerequisite and an advisory?
There are three primary differences.  The first is that a prerequisite is a course, whereas an advisory can be a course, a skill, or a specified type of experience.   The second is that a prerequisite is required, whereas an advisory is recommended.  Finally, Datatel blocks students from registering in a course if they have not met the prerequisite.  Datatel does not block students who have not completed advisories.

What is the difference between a corequisite and a prerequisite?
Both are required courses.  However, prerequisites must be completed before enrolling in a course.  Corequisites may be completed either prior to, or concurrent with, the primary course.

What types of prerequisites are there?
There are three types.  1)  A communication or computation prerequisite is a course in reading, English, or math that must be completed prior to enrollment in a course in another discipline.  An example would be an English prerequisite for a biology course.  This type of prerequisite requires that a data analysis be completed before the prerequisite can be implemented.  2)  A sequential prerequisite is a course in the same discipline that follows a required sequence.  An example would be Spanish 1 as a prerequisite for Spanish 2.  Sequential prerequisites require only a content review for validation.  3)  A standard prerequisite is a prerequisite that is routinely required at a four-year college.  An example would be math as a prerequisite for physics.  Standard prerequisites apply only to transfer level courses.  Validation requires both a content review and references to three comparable courses at a UC or CSU.

What types of corequisites are there?
There are two types of corequisites.  1) A one-way corequisite is an ancillary course whose content is dependent on a primary course that could be taken alone.  For example, an astronomy lab could not be taken without completing an astronomy lecture course.   The lecture, however, could be taken without the lab.  The lab in this case is optional.  2) A two-way corequisite is one of two linked courses in which the content of both courses is interdependent.  An example would be a chemistry lab and a chemistry lecture.  Although two-way corequisites are usually taken concurrently, previous completion may be allowed.  For example, a student might take the chemistry lecture course in fall semester and take the chemistry lab in spring semester.  Both courses are required.

What is a limitation on enrollment?
A limitation on enrollment is a non-course requirement.  Typical examples would be auditions for team or performance courses, admissions to a particular program, or current TB testing.  Students who do not meet the requirement will not be allowed to enroll in the course.

What is a content review?
A content review matches objectives of the prerequisite or corequisite course to the objectives of the primary course.   It is designed to demonstrate which skills from the requisite course will be needed in the primary course. 

What do I do if I’m required to have data scrutiny for my prerequisite?
Contact Institutional Research.  They will guide you through the scrutiny process.

  Print the Section    < back to The Curriculum Handbook