faculty senate
CURRICULUM AND SCHEDULES - Sections in Alphabetical Order:

THE CURRICULUM COMMITTEE HANDBOOK (CCH)

Curriculum Committee
  Bylaws (printable pdf document)
  Board Policy 4020 Program, Curriculum, and Course Development (printable pdf document)
  Administrative Procedure 4020 Program, Curriculum, and Course Development
(printable pdf document)
  Effective Curriculum Practices 2015 (printable pdf document)

Chaffey College Awards: AA/AS, AA-T/AS-T/ and Certificates
  Chaffey College Awards: AA/AS & AA-T/AS-T/ and Certificates
  Board Policy 4100 Graduation Requirements for Degrees and Certificates (printable pdf document)
  Administrative Procedure 4100 Graduation Requirements for Degrees and Certificates (printable pdf document)

Graduation and Transfer Requirements
  Graduation Requirement and Transfer Information Chaffey College Catalog (page will open in a new window above this one)
  IGETC
  CSU GE
  Board Policy 4025 Philosophy and Criteria for Associate Degree and General Education (printable pdf document)
  Administrative Procedure 4025 Philosophy and Criteria for Associate Degree and General Education (printable pdf document)

Chaffey College Discipline Placement
  Discipline Placement

Chaffey College Honors Curriculum
 
Honors Courses
  Honors Curriculum Proposal Form (printable word document)

Approval Requirements for Courses
  Abbreviated Chancellor’s Criteria 
  Annotated Development Criteria for Course or Program Development (printable pdf document)
  Associate Degree Courses
  Unit/Hour Ratios (printable pdf document)
  Repeating Credit Courses
  Imminent Need Criteria

Credit Hour Calculations
  
Hours and Units Calculations for Credit Course Instuction (printable pdf document)
 
Course Repeatability
  
Administrative Procedure 4227 Repeatable Courses (printable pdf document)

Course Repetition
  Board Policy 4225 Course Repetition (printable pdf document)
  Administrative Procedure 4225 Course Repetition (printable pdf document)
  Administrative Procedure 4228 Course Repetition–Significant Lapse of Time (printable pdf document)
  Administrative Procedure 4229 Course Repetition–Variable Units (printable pdf document)

Chaffey College Approval Process
  New Courses
  Modifications (full review)
  Modifications (consent agenda)
  Deactivations and Deletions
  Distance Education
  New Programs of Study
  Program Modifications

Review of Course Outlines of Record

  Good Practices
  Levels of Review
  Elements of Review
  Taxonomy of Verbs
  
Requisites, Advisories, and Limitations on Enrollment

  Board Policy 4260 Prerequisites and Co-Requisites (printable pdf document)
  Administrative Procedure 4260 Prerequisites and Co-Requisites (printable pdf document)
  Good Practices
  Levels of Scrutiny
  Statistical Standards
  Title 5 Regulations

Credit by Examination
  Board Policy 4235 Credit by Examination (printable pdf document)
  Administrative Procedure 4235 Credit by Examination (printable pdf document)

Program Discontinuance
  
Administrative Procedure 4021 Program Discontinuance (printable pdf document)

Distance Education

  Administrative Procedure 4105 Distance Education (printable pdf document)
  Chaffey College Review

  State Criteria
  Good Practice
  Units/Contact Hours
  Diagrammed DIirections on How to Launce a DE Proposal for a Course in CurricUNET (printable word document)

Community Education
  Board Policy 4400 Community Education Program (printable pdf document)
  Administrative Procedure 4400 Community Education Program (printable pdf document)  
 
Cooperative Work Experience
 
Pass/No Pass
  
Administrative Procedure 4232 Pass/No Pass (printable pdf document)

Frequently Asked Questions

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CCH - CHAFFEY COLLEGE AWARDS: AA/AS & AA-T/AS-T/ AND CERTIFICATES

GRADUATION & TRANSFER REQUIREMENTS – A.A./A.S.
ASSOCIATE DEGREES

Chaffey offers both Associate in Arts (AA) and Associate in Science (AS) degrees. Associate in Arts degrees are two-year degrees in Liberal Studies disciplines that provide a broad exploration of a specific area of emphasis. Associate in Science degrees typically are two-year occupational degrees that prepare students for careers in technical
fields. Most AA degree and many AS degrees provide a solid foundation for further academic study for students wishing to transfer. All courses in the major must be completed with a grade of A, B, C, or P or better. (Title 5 § 55063)

The minimum requirements for graduation with the degree of Associate in Arts or Associate in Science are specified by the Board of Governors of the California Community Colleges and the Chaffey College Governing Board. The Associate Degree will be granted upon completion of 60 semester units of work and the fulfillment of the specific requirements listed below.

“All degree requirements including General Education must be completed with an overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or better. In addition, all courses that count toward the Associate Degree major or area of emphasis must be satisfactorily completed with grades of A, B, C, or P.” (Title 5, 55063).
The following is required for all A.A./A.S. degrees:

  1. General Education (minimum of 18 units)
  2. Major Requirements (minimum 18 units)
  3. Electives (any additional units necessary to meet minimum degree requirements of 60 units)
  4. Basic Skills Competency Requirements
    a.   Writing and Reading – ENGL 1A
    b.   Mathematics -  Placement into Mathematics 25 or higher as determined by the Chaffey assessment process, or successful completion of one of the intermediate algebra or higher level math or statistics courses listed below:
    Mathematics 3, 4, 25, 31, 60, 61, 65A, 65B, 75, 81, 85, 425
    Social Science 10
    Statistics 10
  5. Scholarship Requirements -  A minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.00 (C average) in degree applicable units attempted.
  6. Residence Requirements - A minimum of 12 units must be earned at Chaffey College.
  7. Application for Graduation – Students must file a formal application for graduation in the College Counseling Center. Students may graduate at the end of any semester or Summer Session. Refer to the schedule of classes for application deadlines.
  8. Continuous Attendance – The preceding graduation requirements apply to students during the 2014-2015 school year. Students who enrolled at Chaffey prior to Fall 2014 and who have maintained continuous attendance (attendance in at least one semester or two quarters, excluding Summer sessions, each calendar year – January 1 through December 31 – as indicated on a permanent record)at any accredited college have the option of meeting the current requirements or those in effect at the time continuous attendance at Chaffey began. In the event that required courses have been discontinued, students may petition for course substitution by making an appointment with a counselor in the Counseling Center.

GRADUATION & TRANSFER REQUIREMENTS – A.A.-T./A.S.-T. (Associate Degrees, College Catalog, Page 41) (printable pdf document)
The Student Transfer Achievement Reform Act (Senate Bill 1440, now codified in California Education Code sections 66746-66749) guarantees admission to a California State University (CSU) campus for any community college student who completes an “associate degree for transfer”, a newly established variation of the associate degrees traditionally offered at a California community college. The Associate in Arts for Transfer (AA-T) or the Associate in Science for Transfer (AS-T) is intended for students who plan to complete a bachelor's degree in a similar major at a CSU campus. Students completing these degrees (AA-T or AS-T) are guaranteed admission to the CSU system, but not to a particular campus or major. In order to earn one of these degrees, students must complete a minimum of 60 required semester units of CSU-transferable coursework with a minimum GPA of 2.0. Students transferring to a CSU campus that accepts the AA-T or AS-T will be required to complete no more than 60 units after transfer to earn a bachelor’s degree (unless the major is a designated “high-unit” major). This degree may not be the best option for students intending to transfer to a particular CSU campus or a college or university that is not part of the CSU system. Students should consult with a counselor when planning to complete the degree for more information on university
admission and transfer requirements. At press date, Chaffey has nineteen (19) approved transfer degrees:  Administration of Justice, Anthropology, Art History, Business
Administration, Communication Studies, Computer Science, Early Childhood Education, English, Geography, Geology, History, Journalism, Mathematics, Philosophy, Physics, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, and Theatre Arts. Additional transfer degree majors are being developed. Please see a counselor for more information.

The following is required for all AA-T or AS-T degrees:
1. Minimum of 60 CSU-transferable semester units.
2. Minimum grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.0 in all CSUtransferable coursework. Students should keep in mind that while a minimum of 2.0 is required for admission, some majors may require a higher GPA. Consult with a counselor for more information.
3. Completion of a minimum of 18 semester units in an “AA-T” or “AS-T” major as detailed in the Programs of Study section of the catalog. All courses in the major must be completed with a grade of C or better. “P” (Pass) grades are not acceptable for courses in the major. (Title 5 § 55063)
4. Certified completion of the California State University General Education-Breadth pattern (CSU GE, College Catalog, Page 37 - printable pdf document) OR the Intersegmental
General Education Transfer Curriculum pattern (Intersegmental General Education, College Catalog, Page 38 - printable pdf document).

CHAFFEY COLLEGE CERTIFICATES
Certificate programs focus on a specific vocational topic/subject area, and are designed to provide students with knowledge and skills immediately applicable to employment. Certificate programs typically do not require or include general education type courses, and most can be completed in less than two years – sometimes within a single term.
Certificates are awarded to students who have successfully completed the required sequence of courses in an occupational field. A minimum grade of “C” or “P” is required for every course required for the certificate. All certificates have been approved by the Chaffey Curriculum Committee, and are listed – along with their constituent courses –
elsewhere in this catalog.

Chaffey offers two types of certificates:
STATE APPROVED Certificates of Achievement are state-approved certificate programs consisting of 18 or more units of degree-applicable coursework. These certificates appear by name on student’s transcripts.
LOCALLY APPROVED Certificates of Career Preparation are locally approved certificate programs consisting of fewer than 18 units of degree-applicable coursework. These certificates do not appear on student’s transcripts.

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CCH - GRADUATION & TRANSFER REQUIREMENTS - IGETC

INTERSEGMENTAL GENERAL EDUCATION TRANSFER CURRICULUM (IGETC) REQUIREMENTS
(Meeting UC General Education Requirements)

Requirements

Area 1     English Communication
    A:  English Composition
    B:  Critical Thinking - English Composition
    C:  Oral Communication

Area 2    Mathematical Concepts and Quantitative Reasoning

Area 3        Arts and Humanities
    A:  Arts
    B:  Humanities

Area 4         Social and Behavioral Sciences

Area 5        Physical and Biological Sciences
    A:  Physical Science (Lecture Course)
    B:  Physical Science (Lecture and Lab Course)
    C:  Biological Science (Lecture Course)
    D:  Biological Science (Lecture and Lab Course)

Area 6        Language Other Than English

Criteria

Subject Area: English Communication

 (3 courses; 9 semester, 12-15 quarter units)*
* Students transferring to UC do not have to meet the oral communication requirement.

The English Communication requirement shall be fulfilled by completion of three semesters or nine units of lower-division courses in English reading and written composition (1 course), critical thinking-English composition (1 course), and oral communication* (1 course). Successful completion of the course in reading and written composition shall be prerequisite to the course in critical thinking-English composition. The second semester of English composition required by the University of California may be met by those courses in critical thinking taught in a variety of disciplines which provide, as a major component, instruction in the composition of substantial essays and require students to write a sequence of such essays. Written work shall be evaluated for both composition and critical thinking.

Texts chosen in this area should reflect an awareness of cultural diversity. Courses designed exclusively for the satisfaction of remedial composition cannot be counted towards fulfillment of the English composition requirement.

Instruction approved for fulfillment of the requirement in communication is to be designed to emphasize the content of communication as well as the form and should provide an understanding of the psychological basis and the social significance of communication, including how communication operates in various situations. Applicable courses should view communication as the process of human symbolic interaction focusing on the communicative process from the rhetorical perspective: reasoning and advocacy, organization, accuracy; the discovery, critical evaluation and reporting of information; reading and listening effectively as well as speaking and writing. This must include active participation and practice in written communication and oral communication.

Instruction in critical thinking is to be designed to achieve an under standing of the relationship of language to logic, which should lead to the ability to analyze, criticize, and advocate ideas, to reason inductively and deductively, and to identify the assumptions upon which particular conclusions depend. The minimal competence to be expected at the successful conclusion of instruction in critical thinking should be the ability to distinguish fact from judgment, and belief from knowledge, to use elementary inductive and deductive processes, and to recognize common logical errors or fallacies of language and thought.

Subject Area: Mathematical Concepts and Quantitative Reasoning

(1 course; 3 semester, 4-5 quarter units)

The Mathematical Concepts and Quantitative Reasoning requirement shall be fulfilled by completion of a one-semester course in mathematics or statistics above the level of intermediate algebra, with a stated course prerequisite of Intermediate Algebra.  (See the description of "Algebra 2," Statement On Competencies In Mathematics Expected Of Entering Freshmen - 1988, revised February, 1988.)  Courses on the application of statistics to a single discipline may not be used to fulfill this requirement. An appropriate course in statistics must emphasize the mathematical bases of statistics, probability theory and estimation, application and interpretation, uses and misuses, and the analysis and criticism of statistical arguments in public discourse.

Because knowledge relevant to public and private decision making is expressed frequently in quantitative terms, we are routinely confronted with information requiring quantitative analysis, calculation, and the ability to use and criticize quantitative arguments. In addition, many disciplines require a sound foundation in mathematical concepts. The requirement in Mathematical Concepts and Quantitative Reasoning is designed to help prepare students to respond effectively to these challenges.

Subject Area: Arts and Humanities
(at least 3 courses; 9 semester, 12-15 quarter units)

The Arts and Humanities requirement shall be fulfilled by completion of at least three courses which encourage students to analyze and appreciate works of philosophical, historical, literary, aesthetic and cultural importance. Students who have completed this requirement shall have been exposed to a pattern of coursework designed to develop an historical understanding of major civilizations and cultures, both Western and non-Western, and an understanding and appreciation of the contributions and perspectives of women and of ethnic and other minorities. In the Arts, students should also learn to develop an independent and critical aesthetic perspective.

At least one course shall be completed in the Arts and one in the Humanities. Within the arts area, performance and studio classes may be credited toward satisfaction of this subject area if their major emphasis is the integration of history, theory, and criticism. Courses used to satisfy the CSU United States History, Constitution and American Ideals requirement, and the UC American History and Institutions requirement may not be counted in this area but may be taken prior to transfer.

The Arts and Humanities historically constitute the heart of a liberal arts general education because of the fundamental humanizing perspective that they provide for the development of the whole person. Our understanding of the world is fundamentally advanced through the study of Western and non-Western philosophy, language, literature, and the fine arts. Inclusion of the contributions and perspectives of women and of ethnic and other minorities as part of such study will provide us a more complete and accurate view of the world and will enrich our lives.

Subject Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
(at least 3 courses: 9 semester. 12-15 quarter units)

The Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement shall be fulfilled by completion of at least three courses dealing with individual behavior and with human social, political, and economic institutions and behavior in a minimum of two disciplines or in an interdisciplinary sequence. The pattern of coursework completed shall ensure opportunities for students to develop understanding of the perspectives and methods of the social and behavioral sciences. Problems and issues in these areas should be examined in their contemporary, historical, and geographical settings. Students who have completed this requirement shall have been exposed to a pattern of coursework designed to help them gain an understanding and appreciation of the contributions and perspectives of women and of ethnic and other minorities and a comparative perspective on both Western and non-Western societies. The material should be presented from a theoretical point of view and focus on core concepts and methods of the discipline rather than on personal, practical, or applied aspects. Courses used to satisfy the CSU United States History, Constitution and American Ideals requirement, and the UC American History and Institutions requirement may not be counted in this area but may be taken prior to transfer.

Courses in the Social and Behavioral Sciences allow students to gain a basic knowledge of the cultural and social organizations in which they exist as well as the behavior and social organizations of other human societies. Each of us is born into, lives, and must function effectively within an environment that includes other individuals. People have, from earliest times, formed social and cultural groups that constitute the framework for the behavior of the individual as well as the group. Inclusion of the contributions and perspectives of women and of ethnic and other minorities as part of such study will provide us a more complete and accurate view of the world and will enrich our lives.

Subject Area: Physical and Biological Science
(at least 2 courses: 7-9 semester, 9-12 quarter units)

The Physical and Biological Sciences requirement shall be fulfilled by completion of at least two courses, one of which is in Physical Science and one in Biological Science, at least one of which incorporates a laboratory. Courses must emphasize experimental methodology, the testing of hypotheses, and the power of systematic questioning, rather than only the recall of facts. Courses that emphasize the interdependency of the sciences are especially appropriate for non-science majors.The contemporary world is influenced by science and its applications, and many of the most difficult choices facing individuals and institutions concern the relationship of scientific and technological capability with human values and social goals. To function effectively in such a complex world, students must develop a comprehension of the basic concepts of physical and biological sciences, and a sophisticated understanding of science as a human endeavor, including the limitations as well as the power of scientific inquiry.

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CCH - GRADUATION & TRANSFER REQUIREMENTS - CSU GE

CSU GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS
(Meeting CSU General Education Requirements)

Requirements

    
A.  Communication in the English Language & Critical Thinking
                      A1.  Oral Communication
                      A2.  Written Communication
                      A3.  Critical Thinking

    B.  Physical Universe and Its Life Forms
                      B1.  Physical Science
                      B2.  Life Science
                      B3.  Laboratory Activity
                      B4.  Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning

    C.  Arts, Literature, Philosophy, and Foreign Languages
                      C1.  Arts (Art, Dance, Music, Theatre)
                      C2.  Humanities (Literature, Philosophy, Foreign Languages)

    D.     Social, Political, and Economic Institutions and Behavior; Historical Background
                     D1.  Anthropology and Archeology
                     D2.  Economics
                     D3.  Ethnic Studies
                     D4.  Gender Studies
                     D5.  Geography
                     D6.  History
                     D7.  Interdisciplinary Social or Behavioral Science
                     D8.  Political Science, Government, and Legal Institutions
                     D9.  Psychology
                     D10.  Sociology and Criminology

    E.  Lifelong Understanding and Self-Development

Criteria

A.     A minimum of nine semester units or twelve quarter units in communication in the English language, to include both oral communication and written communication, and in critical thinking, to include consideration of common fallacies in reasoning.

Instruction approved for fulfillment of the requirement in communication is to be designed to emphasize the content of communication as well as the form and should provide an understanding of the psychological basis and the social significance of communication, including how communication operates in various situations. Applicable course(s) should view communication as the process of human symbolic interaction focusing on the communicative process from the rhetorical perspective: reasoning and advocacy, organization, accuracy; the discovery, critical evaluation and reporting of information; reading and listening effectively as well as speaking and writing. This must include active participation and practice in written communication and oral communication.

Instruction in critical thinking is to be designed to achieve an understanding of the relationship of language to logic, which should lead to the ability to analyze, criticize, and advocate ideas, to reason inductively and deductively, and to reach factual or judgmental conclusions based on sound inferences drawn from unambiguous statements of knowledge or belief. The minimal competence to be expected at the successful conclusion of instruction in critical thinking should be the demonstration of skills in elementary inductive and deductive processes, including an understanding of the formal and informal fallacies of language and thought, and the ability to distinguish matters of fact from issues of judgment or opinion.

B.     A minimum of twelve semester units or eighteen quarter units to include inquiry into the physical universe and its life forms, with some immediate participation in laboratory activity, and into mathematical concepts and quantitative reasoning and their applications.

Instruction approved for the fulfillment of this requirement is intended to impart knowledge of the facts and principles which form the foundations of living and non-living systems. Such studies should promote understanding and appreciation of the methodologies of science as investigative tools, the limitations of scientific endeavors: namely, what is the evidence and how was it derived?  In addition, particular attention should be given to the influence which the acquisition of scientific knowledge has had on the development of the world's civilizations, not only as expressed in the past but also in present times. The nature and extent of laboratory experience is to be determined by each campus through its established curricular procedures. In specifying inquiry into mathematical concepts and quantitative reasoning and their application, the intention is not to imply merely basic computational skills, but to encourage as well the understanding of basic mathematical concepts.

C.     A minimum of twelve semester units or eighteen quarter units among the arts, literature, philosophy and foreign languages.

Instruction approved for the fulfillment of this requirement should cultivate intellect, imagination, sensibility and sensitivity. It is meant in part to encourage students to respond subjectively as well as objectively to experience and to develop a sense of the integrity of emotional and intellectual response. Students should be motivated to cultivate and refine their affective as well as cognitive and physical faculties through studying great works of the human imagination, which could include active participation in individual esthetic, creative experience. Equally important is the intellectual examination of the subjective response, thereby increasing awareness and appreciation in the traditional humanistic disciplines such as art, dance, drama, literature and music. The requirement should result in the student's better understanding of the interrelationship between the creative arts, the humanities and self. Studies in these areas should include exposure to both Western cultures and non-Western cultures.

Foreign language courses may be included in this requirement because of their implications for cultures both in their linguistic structures and in their use in literature; but foreign language courses which are approved to meet a portion of this requirement are to contain a cultural component and not be solely skills acquisition courses. Campus provisions for fulfillment of this requirement must include a reasonable distribution among the categories specified as opposed to the completion of the entire number of units required in one category.

D.     A minimum of twelve semester units or eighteen quarter units dealing with human social, political, and economic institutions and behavior and their historical background.

Instruction approved for fulfillment of this requirement should reflect the fact that human social, political and economic institutions and behavior are inextricably interwoven. Problems and issues in these areas should be examined in their contemporary as well as historical setting, including both Western and non Western contexts. Campus provisions for fulfillment of this requirement must include a reasonable distribution among the categories specified as opposed to completion of the entire number of units required in one category.

E.     A minimum of three semester units or four quarter units in study designed to equip human beings for lifelong understanding and development of themselves as integrated physiological and psychological entities.

Instruction approved for fulfillment of this requirement should facilitate understanding of the human being as an integrated physiological, social, and psychological organism. Courses developed to meet this requirement are intended to include selective consideration of such matters as human behavior, sexuality, nutrition, health, stress, key relationships of humankind to the social and physical environment, and implications of death and dying. Physical activity could be included, provided that it is an integral part of the study described herein.

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CCH - CURRICULUM COMMITTEE: GOOD PRACTICES - IMMINENT NEED CRITERIA

CRITERIA FOR ESTABLISHING “IMMINENT NEED”
Chaffey College Curriculum Committee
Imminent Need Criteria

(Adopted Fall 2005)

Proposals that meet one or more of the following criteria will be evaluated for expedited approval:

stricture imposed by a regulatory agency (e.g., state board or licensing agency)
grant requirement that enforces a timeline as a condition of funding
legislation or directive from state legislators or Chancellor’s Office
course, program, or requisite change with significant impact on enrollment management
course, program, or requisite change with significant impact on accreditation
course, program, or requisite change with significant impact on articulation
course, program, or requisite change with disproportionate impact on student access or success
other pressing need (subject to approval as “imminent need” by Curriculum Committee)

Note: Failure to meet foreseeable deadlines does not constitute “imminent need.”

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CCH - CURRICULUM COMMITTEE: GOOD PRACTICES - DISCIPLINE PLACEMENT

DISCIPLINE PLACEMENT POLICY
Adopted Spring 2007
Revised March 11, 2015

Sources:

  • Title 5 §53200(b)
  • California Community Colleges Curriculum website http://www.ccccurriculum.net/faq/#A4   (page will open in a new window above this one)
  • ASCCC. (2004). Qualifications for Faculty Service In The California Community Colleges: Minimum Qualifications, Placement of Courses Within Disciplines, and Faculty Service Areas.  http://www.asccc.org/sites/default/files/publications/FacultyQuals_0.pdf  (page will open in a new window above this one)
  • Minimum Qualifications for Faculty and Administrators in California Community Colleges, 2014, (link),
  • Chaffey College BP 4020
  • Chaffey College AP 4020

When new courses are created or existing courses are modified, sometimes the issue of discipline placement arises. In such instances, the goal should always be to arrive at collegial consensus regarding discipline placement. Consensus can be a tricky thing, and it should be acknowledged first and foremost that actions are taken with the students’ best interest in mind. Give and take will be required when reviewing course descriptions, course content, and course objectives. Theoretical frameworks should be collegially compared when discussing a course from multiple disciplinary perspectives. Final decisions will not be taken until all interested stakeholders have had an opportunity for input.  The following steps are recommended by the Chaffey College Curriculum Committee, in following with best practices recommended by the ASCCC Curriculum Committee:

  • Initial discipline placement will be made by the course originator in consultation with the discipline faculty, discipline coordinator, and school dean. In the case where a new course proposal, or a proposal for an existing course modification,  gives rise to discipline placement questions, the issue will be initially  discussed within the curriculum committee. The curriculum committee chair will send an email to appropriate faculty summarizing the issues discussed at the curriculum committee meeting.
  • If a consensus regarding discipline placement is not reached at this first curriculum committee discussion, the Curriculum Committee will identify areas of concern and request further review by curriculum committee representatives in collaboration with the proposal initiator, representatives from the additional discipline, as well as appropriate deans.
  • Review will be conducted under the guidelines in Minimum Qualifications for Faculty and Administrators in California Community Colleges, 2014. The placement recommendation will be based on a careful review of course content, course objectives, comparable courses at other institutions, and other relevant issues.
  • Upon completion of review,  curriculum committee representative(s) will recommend placement of course in appropriate discipline[s] in one of four categories:
    • Single Discipline: For purposes of both student credit and faculty qualifications, course should be taught in one discipline only.  The vast majority of courses at Chaffey College are identified and taught by one discipline.
    • Dual-Coded:  Students will have the option to get credit in more than one listing.   Dual-coding addresses student credit only; it does not specify faculty preparation.  This option allows students to legitimately fulfill program or graduation requirements.   The course would be taught by faculty in one discipline only.
    • Cross-Listed:  Course will be listed in two or more disciplines.  Cross-listing, unlike Dual-Coding, addresses faculty qualifications, specifying that faculty with minimum qualifications in either discipline can teach the course. Qualifications of individual faculty will remain the purview of the schools or union as appropriate.
    • Interdisciplinary: Course will be identified as interdisciplinary and may be offered in two or more disciplines as determined by the appropriate schools.  The course would be either team-taught by faculty in both disciplines or taught by a single instructor with preparation in both disciplines, as specified in Minimum Qualifications for Faculty and Administrators in California Community Colleges.  The issue here is faculty qualifications.
  • Curriculum committee members involved with the discipline placement discussion will submit discipline placement recommendation with rationale to Curriculum Committee and to school representatives.
  • Rationale will be reviewed by the entire Curriculum Committee at second reading.  Initiator and/or school representatives will have an opportunity to address committee at this time. Final decisions will not be taken until all interested stakeholders have had an opportunity for input.  

The task of assigning courses to disciplines is important for two reasons. First it helps describe the course by classifying it in a discipline (e.g., Anthropology 103 is clearly an anthropology course). Second, it indicates what preparation is needed to teach the course. Only a faculty member with a master’s degree or its equivalent in anthropology may teach Anthropology 103 (except if this course is also listed under another discipline).

A college curriculum committee must be very careful to place courses in disciplines according to the preparation needed by the person who will be determined qualified to teach them. Curriculum committee members should remember that placing courses within disciplines is done to assure that the instructor qualified to teach those courses are likely to possess the appropriate preparation to teach them effectively. Curriculum committee members should resist the impulse to place courses in disciplines primarily to broaden the pool of those who may be considered qualified to teach those courses or to restrict the pool of potential instructors as a means of protecting the assignments of any faculty member or group of faculty who have traditionally taught such courses.

We also must keep in mind that cross-listing a course might affect its articulation status. If, for example, Journalism 140 is also listed as Speech Communication 140, then the articulation agreements for either course need to be extended to the other course title. Articulation could be denied if a receiving institution questions the appropriateness of such a cross-listing on the grounds that a course whose content could be taught by an instructor in a different discipline would not have sufficient concentration in the discipline for which it is being articulated. This problem would be more likely to occur with articulation to University of California campuses, which require faculty review of community college courses, than at California State University campuses, where articulation relies on community college certification. For this reason, curriculum committees should include your college’s articulation officer, who can provide insight into these concerns and make suggestions. (From ASCCC (2014) Qualifications for Faculty Service In The California Community Colleges: Minimum Qualifications, Placement of Courses Within Disciplines, and Faculty Service Areas.  http://californiacommunitycolleges.cccco.edu/Portals/0/FlipBooks/2014_MQHandbook/#/0 (page will open in a new window above this one)

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CCH - APPROVAL REQUIREMENTS FOR COURSES - ASSOCIATE DEGREE COURSES

APPROVAL REQUIREMENTS FOR ASSOCIATE DEGREE COURSES
(Title 5 and Academic Senate Good Practice Documents)

1. Courses that are appropriate to the associate degree include the following types:

  • All CSU or UC transferable courses.
  • Courses that apply to the major in non-baccalaureate occupational fields.
  • English courses not more than one level below the first transfer level composition course (English 450 or above).
  • All mathematical courses above and including Elementary Algebra (Math 410). Credit courses comparable to English 450 and Math 410 or higher taught in other disciplines (e.g., BUSOT-88).

2. Degree-applicable courses have a grading policy reflecting competence in course objectives, including the following:

A grading policy in the course outline that is clearly based on course objectives. Course grading based on demonstrated proficiency at least part of which is either in the form of written essays or, if the curriculum committee deems it more appropriate, problem solving ability, which may be added to or substituted for essay writing.

3. Degree-applicable courses grant units according to established policy, based on Carnegie Unit criteria:

Each unit of credit requires approximately 48 hours of student learning time (Title 5).  As a matter of standard higher education practice (but not as a matter of law), in traditional academic disciplines (such as English, history, mathematics, etc.), it is expected that one third of these hours will occur in the classroom ("recitation" or lecture), and two-thirds of them will occur outside the classroom ("study" or homework).  Thus, for one academic unit, a student would be expected to spend either one hour a week in a lecture course or three hours per week in a lab course.  Academic units assume the following formula for college-level lecture courses: 

16 hours of classroom time
+ 32 hours of homework =
48 hours total student learning time

The 48 hour formula is based on the 16 week minimum.  The formula may be adjusted to allow a maximum of a 19 week semester.

4. Course outlines for degree-applicable courses reflect requirements that are sufficiently intense to require study outside of class:

Description of course content, objectives, and assignments demonstrate that the student will need to study outside of class at a ratio of approximately two hours of homework to one hour of class for a lecture class.  Many traditional academic courses award three units.  The number of hours expected for such a course would be:

48 hours of classroom time
+ 96 hours of homework =
144 hours total student learning time

5. Course outlines for degree-applicable courses clearly state any prerequisites, corequisites, limitations on enrollment, or advisories.

6. Degree-applicable courses require students to possess basic skills at entry, with course assignments requiring competency in reading, writing, or computation, as appropriate.

7. Degree-applicable courses require critical thinking about college-level concepts, reflected in  course objectives [and/or student learning outcomes] incorporating language that demonstrates critical thinking.

8. Degree-applicable courses require college-level learning skills, with course descriptions, content, objectives, and assignments that demonstrate the necessity of college-level vocabulary and learning skills.

9. Degree-applicable courses have  a course outline of record that specifies unit value, scope, objectives, content, assignments, instructional methodology, and appropriate methods of evaluation.

10. Degree-applicable courses must have a complete course outline of record properly filed with the appropriate college agency and available to the college community for review.

11. Degree-applicable courses can only be taken once unless they qualify for repeatability under state regulations.

CRITERIA FOR ASSOCIATE DEGREE APPLICABLE COURSES
(Title 5 Standards and Criteria)

An associate-degree applicable course meets the following requirements:

  1. is appropriate to the associate degree.
  2. has a grading policy reflecting competence in course objectives.
  3. grants units according to established policy.
  4. is sufficiently intense to require study outside of class.
  5. clearly states any prerequisites, corequisites, or advisories.
  6. requires basic skills at entry.
  7. incorporates difficulty by requiring critical thinking about college-level concepts. 
  8. requires college-level learning skills.
  9. has a course outline of record that specifies:
    a.   unit value
    b.   scope
    c.   objectives
    d.   content
    e.   assignments
    f.    instructional methodology
    g.   methods of evaluation
    h.   can only be taken once unless it qualifies for repeatability under state regulations
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CCH - CHAFFEY COLLEGE HONORS CURRICULUM

HONORS CURRRICULUM
Approved by the Honors Committee Spring 2011
Approved by the Curriculum Committee Spring 2011

1.   Honors Courses 

a.   Definition

These are courses offered and specially designated as “Honors sections” in the catalog. These classes are characterized by rigorous research and writing components, with an emphasis on presenting and sharing that research and writing. While these classes are geared toward students in the Honors Program, non-Honors students may also enroll. All students enrolled in an Honors course will be expected to meet the rigorous Honors research and writing requirements, regardless of whether or not they are Honors students. A field trip or out-of-class component is also required for all students in such courses.

b.  Curriculum Committee process
      i. New Honors course – will go through the standard Curriculum Committee course approval process for a new course
     ii. Modification of an existing Honors course – will go through the standard Curriculum Committee approval process for a modification – including SLO information

2.  Honors Contracts  

a.  Definition
A contract seeks to replicate, insofar as it is possible, the Honors Course experience for Honors students enrolled in non-Honors courses. Honors contracts may be undertaken only by students in the Honors Program, though the Honors Committee may make exceptions in extenuating circumstances for non-Honors students. The decision as to whether or not to allow student in a given course and section to undertake a contract rests solely with the instructor of the course and section in question.  In order to complete a contract, an Honors student, with the permission and input of his or her instructor, devises a plan that would augment the non-Honors course, fulfilling the research, writing, presentation and out-of-class component required by Honors Courses. The student and instructor then fill out a form, which must be approved and kept on record at the Honors Program office. At the end of the semester, the instructor indicates to the Honors Program office whether or not the student has fulfilled the terms of the contract.

b.  Curriculum Committee process

      i.  nothing; contracts are between the faculty member and the individual Honors student

3.  Honors Addendum


a.  Definition

     The Honors Addendum is the form that modifies an existing transfer-level course, allowing the course to be offered as an Honors Course.

b.  Curriculum Committee process

      i.  The Honors Addenda will be submitted to the Curriculum Committee after Honors Committee review and approval. The Honors Committee will look for Honors and alignment to the overall course.
     ii.  SLOs will be included on the honors addenda
    iii.  Once the curriculum office receives these addenda,  they will be attached to COR.
    iv.  Curriculum Committee will review these addenda on an “as needed” basis at the Curriculum Committee meetings. At this time, general approval will be requested. The Curriculum Office staff will email any concerns or questions to the Honors Committee.

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CCH - APPROVAL REQUIREMENTS FOR COURSES - ABBREVIATED CHANCELLOR'S CRITERIA

CHANCELLOR'S APPROVAL CRITERIA

Mission

A course falls within the mission of California Community Colleges when it meets the following criteria:

  • It is designed for lower division credit towards the degree, for purposes of transfer, for occupational preparation, for economic development, or for career supplementation or upgrade
  • It develops the ability of enrolled students to succeed in college level courses (applies to non-credit courses only).
  • It provides systematic instruction in a body of content or skills whose mastery forms the basis of the student grade. 
  • It is directed at the appropriate level for community colleges; that is, it is not directed either at a level beyond the associate degree (or the first two years of college), or at the primary or secondary school level.
  • It is not primarily a vocational or recreational.
  • It provides distinct instructional content and specific instructional objectives
  • It does not provide only an activity or service, without instructional content (e.g., assistive or therapeutic activity, use of college facilities or resources without specific instructional objectives, or assessment testing).
  • It is congruent with the mission statement and comprehensive or master plan of the college.

Need
A course meets the needs of a California Community College when it meets one or more the following criteria:
  • It supports the stated goals and objectives of a college program (all courses).
  • It responds to student demand (all courses).
  • It has demonstrated transfer applicability for a university major or general education requirement (transfer-level courses only).
  • It prepares students for viable occupations, as demonstrated by labor market information, employer surveys, job market analysis, or other comparable information (occupational courses only).
  • It prepares students for needed job enhancement (occupational courses only).
  • It is recommended by local occupational consortiums (occupational courses only).
Feasibility
A course is feasible when it meets the following criteria:
  • The college has the funding, faculty, facilities, and equipment to offer the course.
  • The college has the resources needed to offer the course at the level of quality described in the Course Outline of Record.
  • The college commits to offering the course at least once every two years, unless the goals and rationale justify a longer time frame as being in the best interests of students.
Compliance
A course is compliant when the design of the course is not in conflict with any law[s], including the following:

• State and federal laws, both statutes and regulations. 
• Laws particularly affecting community colleges, including
        •   Open course regulations
        •   Course repeatability regulations
        •   Regulations requiring immediate supervision by a qualified instructor
        •   Statutes and regulations on student fees
        •   Prerequisite, corequisite, advisory, or enrollment limitation regulations
•  Particular provisions of the practice act[s] for a health occupation.
•  Constitutional prohibitions against political and religious activities in public instruction.
•  Any other law that may affect the course (e.g., licensing laws in a particular occupation).

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CCH - APPROVAL REQUIREMENTS FOR COURSES - REPEATING CREDIT COURSES

REPEATABLE COURSES
Sources:
Title 5 §55041
Bruno & Morse. (2012) Repeatability: Dealing with the New Regulations. ASCCC.
Chaffey College AP 4227 Repeatable Courses -  https://www.chaffey.edu/policies/approved/4227_AP.pdf ( printable pdf document)
Chaffey College AP 4228 Course Repetition – Significant Lapse of Time https://www.chaffey.edu/policies/approved/4228_AP.pdf (printable pdf document)
Chaffey College AP 4229 Course Repetition – Variable Units https://www.chaffey.edu/policies/approved/4229_AP.pdf (printable pdf document)

Under new (Fall 2012) Title 5 regulation §55041, courses that can be marked as repeatable, meaning that any student can attempt and successfully complete the course for credit more than once, will fall into three categories:

    1. Courses coded as athletics, including off-season conditioning courses, subject to the limitations on hours per sport per year in Title 5 §58162;
    2. Courses that are required to be repeated in order to complete or gain entry into a bachelor’s degree program at any CSU or UC campus in any discipline. Note that repetition of the course must be required for the bachelor’s degree, not simply allowed; and
    3. Courses designed specifically for participation in intercollegiate academic or vocational competitions. The competitions must be sanctioned by an external oversight body, and the objectives or outcomes for successful completion of the course must be directly tied to participation in the competition.

That is the full list regarding repeatable courses. No other exceptions will be allowed.

What about cases when students need to repeat courses for reasons like retraining or updating skills or classes for students with disabilities?
 This question raises the distinction between repeatable courses that can be retaken by any student without special permission and circumstances in which any given student can be permitted to repeat a course on an individual basis. The new Title 5 regulations include several instances in which colleges can grant individual students the opportunity to repeat a course that he or she has passed previously. Such circumstances include legally mandated retraining, employer mandated retraining, significant lapse of time (now defined as not less than 36 months), and others. Courses for students with disabilities can be repeated as many times as necessary as long as Disabled Student Services verifies the need for the student to retake the course. The full list of instances in which colleges can allow students to repeat a course on an individual basis is included in new Title 5 §55040. Each district will need to develop policies to outline the process through which it will verify and document a student’s need to repeat a course under these provisions. 

What are colleges advised to do with courses that were once repeatable but now will not be?
Several options may be available. Curriculum committees will need to examine their college curriculum carefully and work with discipline faculty to make the changes that best suit the students’ needs. Two of the most common options that have been suggested are breaking the courses into levels (for example, Swimming 101, formerly repeatable four times, now becomes Swimming 101, Swimming 102, Swimming 103, and Swimming 104, each of which may be taken successfully once by any single student) or into more specific curriculum (for example, Theater Performance 10, formerly repeatable four times, becomes Comedic Theater, Tragic Theater, Modern Theater Supporting Role, Modern Theater Starring Role, etc., each of which can be taken successfully once). Note that in either of these cases, each individual course into which the formerly repeatable course is divided must now have its own Course Outline of Record listing separate course objectives that differ to a reasonable degree from the other variations or levels.

But if we separate our courses into levels, each one may not have enough students by itself to survive. Can a college offer multiple levels of a subject at the same time and under the supervision of the same instructor?
Title 5 and Education Code do not specifically offer any guidance regarding courses being combined in this manner. The most important factor to consider in offering classes in such combinations is that all statewide and local curricular standards must be met for all of the courses included. For example, the total enrollment for the combined courses should not exceed the enrollment maximum set for any of the courses when they are offered separately. The objectives outlined in the Course Outline of Record for each class must also be met to avoid any lowering of instructional quality. Although the courses are being taught in the same place and by the same instructor, the standards and expectations set by the college in the course outline must still be respected.

Is there a limit to how many variations or levels of a subject can be created? 
There is no Title 5 limit on the number of levels or variations that can be created. However, the new regulations do establish that in physical education and visual and performing arts, students may have no more than four enrollments in any given group of active participatory courses that are related in content (commonly known as a family of courses). So while colleges may offer seven levels of golf or piano, students will not be allowed to take all seven levels, as they are limited to four enrollments. Note that all attempts, including unsuccessful ones such as a failure or a transcripted withdrawal, count among these four enrollments. This limitation is specific to physical education and to visual and performing arts; career technical education (CTE) and other disciplines have no such restriction.

How will colleges know how to divide courses into families or how many families to create?
The construction of course families is, at this time, a local decision. Colleges can decide for themselves what their course families should be and how to group courses together. However, the Academic Senate advises colleges to be conservative in the creation of families. For example, while major dance styles such as ballet and jazz might legitimately constitute different families, if colleges begin to decide that every imaginable style of dance is a separate family in which students should be able to enroll four times (salsa, flamenco, etc.), then eventually the right to make these decisions locally may well disappear.

(from Bruno & Morse. 2012. Repeatability: Dealing with the New Regulations. ASCCC.)

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CCH - CHAFFEY APPROVAL PROCESS- NEW COURSES

APPROVAL PROCESS FOR NEW COURSES
Step 1 
Originator Submits Proposal in CurricUNET. Dean must ok the proposal to launch it into the queue in CurricUNET.

Step 2 
Discipline Coordinator Reviews Proposal
Curriculum Committee Copyeditor Edits Proposal
Curriculum Representative Reviews Proposal
Dean Reviews Proposal
Discipline Reviews Proposal (optional)
Step 2a 
Originator Makes Changes Requested by Reviewers

Step 3 
Articulation Officer Reviews Proposal
Catalog Schedule Coordinator Reviews Proposal
Disability Programs and Services Reviews Proposal (optional)
Information Technology Reviews Proposal (optional)
Research Librarian Reviews Proposal
Office of Instruction Reviews Proposal

Step 4 
Curriculum Committee Technical Review Chair Reviews Proposal
Step 4a 
Originator Makes Changes Requested by Reviewers

Step 5 
Curriculum Committee Does First Reading of Proposal
Step 5a 
Originator Makes Changes Requested by Curriculum Committee

Step 6 
Curriculum Committee Does Second Reading of Proposal
Step 6a 
Originator Makes Changes Requested by Curriculum Committee

Step 7 
Curriculum Committee Gives Final Approval

Step 8 
Office of Instruction Implements Course with Approval of Board of Trustees

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CCH - CHAFFEY APPROVAL PROCESS - MODIFICATIONS (full review)

APPROVAL PROCESS FOR MODIFICATIONS (Full Review)
Step 1 
Originator Submits Proposal

Step 2 
Discipline Coordinator Reviews Proposal
Curriculum Committee Copyeditor Edits Proposal
Curriculum Representative Reviews Proposal
Dean Reviews Proposal
Discipline Reviews Proposal (optional)
Step 2a 
Originator Makes Changes Requested by Reviewers

Step 3 
Articulation Officer Reviews Proposal
Catalog Schedule Coordinator Reviews Proposal
Disability Programs and Services Reviews Proposal (optional)
Information Technology Reviews Proposal (optional)
Research Librarian Reviews Proposal
Office of Instruction Reviews Proposal
Curriculum Committee Technical Review Chair Reviews Proposal
Step 3a 
Originator Makes Changes Requested by Reviewers

Step 4 
Curriculum Committee Does First Reading of Proposal
Step 4a 
Originator Makes Changes Requested by Curriculum Committee

Step 5 
Curriculum Committee Does Second Reading of Proposal
Step 5a 
Originator Makes Changes Requested by Curriculum Committee

Step 6 
Curriculum Committee Gives Final Approval

Step 7 
Office of Instruction Implements Course Changes

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CCH - CHAFFEY APPROVAL PROCESS - MODIFICATIONS (consent agenda)

APPROVAL PROCESS FOR MINOR MODIFICATIONS (Consent Agenda)
Step 1 
Originator Submits Proposal

Step 2 
Discipline Coordinator Reviews Proposal
Curriculum Representative Reviews Proposal
Dean Reviews Proposal
Discipline Reviews Proposal (optional)

Step 3 
Research Librarian Reviews Proposal
Curriculum Committee Technical Review Chair Reviews Proposal
Office of Instruction Reviews Proposal

Step 4 
Curriculum Committee Approves Proposal

Step 5 
Office of Instruction Implements Proposal

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CCH - CHAFFEY APPROVAL PROCESS - DEACTIVATIONS & DELETIONS

APPROVAL PROCESS FOR DEACTIVATIONS AND DELETIONS
Step 1 
Originator Submits Proposal

Step 2 
Discipline Coordinator Reviews Proposal
Curriculum Representative Reviews Proposal
Dean Reviews Proposal
Discipline Reviews Proposal (optional)

Step 3 
Articulation Officer Reviews Proposal
Catalog Schedule Coordinator Reviews Proposal
Office of Instruction Reviews Proposal

Step 4 
Curriculum Committee Approves Proposal

Step 5 
Office of Instruction Implements Proposal

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CCH - CHAFFEY APPROVAL PROCESS - DISTANCE EDUCATION

APPROVAL PROCESS FOR DISTANCE EDUCATION DELIVERY
Step 1 
Originator Submits Proposal

Step 2 
Discipline Coordinator Reviews Proposal
Curriculum Representative Reviews Proposal
Dean Reviews Proposal
Discipline Reviews Proposal (optional)

Step 3 
Disability Programs and Services Reviews Proposal (optional)
Information Technology Reviews Proposal (optional)
Research Librarian Reviews Proposal
Office of Instruction Reviews Proposal

Step 4 
Curriculum Committee Approves Proposal

Step 5 
Office of Instruction Implements Approved Modality

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CCH - CHAFFEY APPROVAL PROCESS - NEW PROGRAMS OF STUDY

APPROVAL PROCESS FOR NEW PROGRAMS OF STUDY
Step 1 
Originator Submits Proposal

Step 2 
Discipline Coordinator Reviews Proposal
Dean Reviews Proposal

Step 3 
Office of Instruction Reviews Proposal

Step 4 
Curriculum Committee Reviews Proposal
Faculty Senate Reviews Proposal
Needs Analysis Submitted to Institutional Research

Step 5 
Completed Needs Analysis Submitted to Chief Instructional Officer
Completed Needs Analysis Submitted to Curriculum Committee

Step 6
Originator Completes Criteria Narrative
Library Confirms Availability of Resources
Originator Submits Course outlines for New Program Courses
Faculty Senate Reviews Proposal for Discipline Placement

Step 7
Curriculum Committee Gives Final Approval
Office of Instruction Does Full Review
Region IX Deans Do Full Review

Step 8
Board of Trustees Gives Final Approval

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CCH - CHAFFEY APPROVAL PROCESS - PROGRAM MODIFICATIONS

PROGRAM MODIFICATIONS (NON SUBSTANTIAL CHANGES)
Step 1 
Originator Submits Proposal

Step 2 
Discipline Coordinator Reviews Proposal
Curriculum Representative Reviews Proposal
Dean Reviews Proposal
Discipline Reviews Proposal (optional)

Step 3 
Catalog Schedule Coordinator Reviews Proposal
Office of Instruction Reviews Proposal

Step 4 
Curriculum Committee Does First Reading of Proposal
Step 4a 
Originator Makes Changes Requested by Curriculum Committee

Step 5 
Curriculum Committee Does Second Reading of Proposal
Step 5a 
Originator Makes Changes Requested by Curriculum Committee

Step 6 
Curriculum Committee Gives Final Approval

Step 7 
Office of Instruction Implements Program Changes

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